Monday, 22 August 2016

584. Dulce de leche baked yogurt(Bhapa Doi)

Hey anand umang bhayo, jai ho Nandlal ki,Nand ke anand bhayo, jai Kanhiya lal ki
    
   Hindus all over the world will celebrate Janmashtami, Gokulashtami, Krishna Jayanti, Ashtami Rohini as its known on Thursday 25th August this year. What is Janmashtami? Janmashtami is the birthday of Lord Krishna. Lord Krishna is the eighth avatar(incarnation) of Lord Vishnu. He took the human form and came to this earth over 5000years ago, 5243 to be exact to vanquish evil and bring back faith in religion. Its believed that Lord Krishna was born at midnight. He was the eighth son of Devaki and Vasudev(of the Yadava dynasty) from Mathura. His maternal uncle Kansa (Devaki's brother) ascended the throne by imprisoning his father King Ugrasena.King Kansa was a tyrant. After hearing a prophesy by the heavenly voice that the eighth son of Devaki would kill him, Kansa imprisoned his sister Devaki and her husband Vasudev. Kansa killed the previous children born to Devaki. It is believed that when Krishna was to be born, all the people in the palace and Mathura fell into deep sleep except for Devaki and Vasudev. As soon as Krishna was born, the prison gates opened and Vasudev was instructed by the Supreme voice to take baby Krishna to Gokul village and place in the crib at Nanda and Yashoda's house. That same day, Yashoda had given birth to a girl who is believed to be Goddess Durga herself. Vasudev left baby (Bal) Krishna at Nanda's house and brought back the girl to Mathura. When everyone woke up from the deep sleep, Kansa immediately went to the prison to kill the eighth son. But instead he found a girl. But just that the prophesy doesn't come true, he tried to kill the girl who slipped away from his hands and went towards the heaven. But also warned that Kansa that his vanquisher had already taken birth. 



      Lord Krishna was raised by his foster parents Nanda and Yashoda. Kansa was killed by Lord Krishna as prophesied but his work was not done as yet. As we read the Srimad Bhagavatam(Bhagavata Purana), Lord Krishna had lots of work to do to restore faith and vanquish evil. Its not really possible for me to write about all His work here, but for every Hindu Lord Krishna's birth is of great importance.
    To celebrate this auspicious day, people usually fast the whole day. Some take no water, some take water only and others fast by not eating any grains and pulses. Around midnight puja is performed, bhajans(hymns) are sung praising Krishna and around midnight His birth is celebrated with much pomp, songs and dance. After that abhishek(bathing and dressing up the Lord) is performed. A variety of food is offered the Lord as bhog and finally people break their fast by taking prasad (the offering). Some break the fast the next day at sunrise. 
    Bal Gopal (Krishna is known by 108 different names) as a small child loved milk, yogurt(dahi) and butter(makhan). He would 'steal' makhan or dahi from the pots of the gopis home. To celebrate his childhood pastimes, usually a pot of yogurt is hung high up. Then young boys form a huge pyramid and get a young boy to break the pot with a stick. This ritual and a fun time for all is performed after Janmashtami.


    To celebrate this Janmashtami with my #FoodieMonday#Bloghop friends, I have prepared baked yogurt or Bhapa Doi as an offering for our 54th theme #Janmashtami. It has cream, milk and yogurt which all are Bal Gopal's favourite. I flavoured the baked yogurt with dulce de leche(milk jam or condensed milk heated till it turns brown). I've always wanted to baked yogurt since the first time I tasted it as prasadam at my sister in law's house in Mumbai. She and her husband are both devotees of ISKCON and there's never a time when there is no prasad (offering) at their home. They tend to get prasad through other devotees from all over India. Bhapa doi was one such prasad sent all the way from Kolkata. Here's my recipe for dulce de leche baked yogurt.














DULCE DE LECHE BAKED YOGURT
Makes 6
food photography: Namrata Patel

½-¾ cup sweetened condensed milk
1 cup hung yogurt* or greek yogurt
1 cup fresh cream (or milk)
a few strands of saffron (kesar)
2-3 tbsp dulce de leche

For topping:
Mixed chopped nuts ( I used hazelnuts, walnuts, almonds and pistachios)
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. 
  2. Take 6 ramekin bowls or earthenware bowls.
  3. Place them in an ovenproof deep tray.
  4. Whisk sweetened condensed milk, cream and thick yogurt together.
  5. Add saffron and mix.
  6. Pour the mixture equally into the bowls. Fill them ¾ full.
  7. Pour water in the tray till it reaches halfway around the bowls.
  8. Place the tray with the bowls in the oven.
  9. Bake the yogurt for 10-15 minutes or till a toothpick inserted in the yogurt comes out clean.
  10. Take the tray out of the oven. 
  11. Let the baked yogurt cool down.
  12. Put it in the fridge till required.
  13. Sprinkle nuts or fruits on top and serve.
Tips:
  • * Put about 1½ cups of fresh yogurt in a muslin cloth or cotton cloth. Hang it over the kitchen tap or place the cloth in a strainer. Let the water from the yogurt drain out for 20-30 minutes. 
  • If you don't want to use dulce de leche, flavour it with spices or fruit purees of your choice.
  • Use only ½ cup of sweetened condensed milk if you don't want the baked yogurt too sweet.
  • Top the yogurt with nuts, fruits, or even compote.
  • Don't over bake it.
  • Remember to use ovenproof bowls and tray.
  • For a lighter dessert, replace the cream with milk.
  • If you don't have individual bowls you can use a small ovenproof tray (8"X8"). Cut the baked yogurt into pieces and serve.
  • To prepare dulce de leche read here.
You may want to check out the following:
samo/moriyo kheer
beetroot halwa
shrikhand
kalakand

Sending this recipe for the following event:
Blog Hop

       

Tuesday, 16 August 2016

583. Karachi Cookies

Only Bakes Challenge#1

   I love baking mostly breads,cakes, muffins and cookies, a few pies and adding to the list a new passion, scones. To share my love for baking I started ONLY BAKES group on Facebook. I invited my family members, friends and a few blogger friends to join the group. I started the group in February 2016. Initially I had just a handful of people who joined the group. Slowly, some members and blogger friends like Saswati, Jolly, Nisa, Gayathri, Shobha,Avin, Latha began to post their bakes on the page. For a couple of months I thought,"Gosh, I've started a group and its got just a few members.' Then suddenly membership requests began to pour in and now there's no looking back. Right now as I write this post we have over 6000 members. I find that some members share really interesting bakes, some are very creative and some just want to collect all the recipes in the world. 
  At this point I would like to mention that even though we are members of many groups on Facebook, etiquette still has to be maintained. Some forget words like please and thank you and demand a recipe. Its very disheartening to see in the comment section of a photo or recipe you have posted, rcp.... I didn't even understand that till my neighbour mentioned that it means recipe!! I was totally taken aback. No nice words or anything! Its always nice to encourage people who have taken time to prepare, photograph and share a recipe by commenting. This encourages them to share more with you. Learning from young or old should never stop. No one on this earth is born knowing everything. Learning from others is a satisfyingand uplifting experience.
  Since a lot of the members were asking for recipes which is not a criteria for posting on ONLY BAKES, I decided to start a monthly challenge. This would also help new bakers to build up their confidence and bake new things, baking together is enjoyable and sharing what others have baked is fun. 
  Vandana Jangid a member in the group baked Karachi cookies, photographed and posted it.  They looked absolutely tempting and yummy. I read the recipe and it was very easy to bake them. So I set Karachi Cookies or biscuits as they are called as the challenge. Thank you so much Vandana Jangid for sharing the recipe with the group.
   Karachi cookies or biscuits are not from Karachi at all. They are very famous cookies baked at the Karachi Bakery in Hyderabad. Khanchand Ramnani, a Sindhi who migrated from Karachi to Hyderabad in 1947, started Karchi Bakery. He set up the first shop in Moazzam Jahi Market and till date has many branches not only in Hyderabad but also in Dubai, Mumbai, Vizag. 
    What's so good about these cookies? Well firstly these buttery cookies do not contain any baking agent. Secondly they are fruity. Tutti frutti is added to the dough, speckles of red, green , yellow show up against the light cream background. Nowadays other dried fruits too are added like raisins, currants, cranberries and nuts too. Rose essence is added to the dough to give it an exotic taste but some prefer cardamom. 
     When baking these cookies, I found that once the ingredients at hand, they are the easiest and most delicious cookies to bake.








KARACHI COOKIES/BISCUITS
Makes about 20 pieces
Recipe source : Vandana Jangid

1 cup plain flour (all purpose flour, maida)
100g (5 tbsp) butter, at room temperature
½ cup powdered sugar
½ tsp cardamom powder (elachi powder)
1 tbsp milk
⅓ cup tutti frutti

  1. Put butter and sugar in a big bowl. Cream sugar and butter with a whip or spoon till it becomes soft and appears a little white.
  2. Add the cardamom powder and milk. Mix well.
  3. Add the flour and mix with a spoon till a soft dough is formed. The dough will appear too soft.
  4. Let the dough rest for 5 minutes.
  5. In the meantime get the cling film,foil or plastic sheets ready to wrap the dough.
  6. Divide the dough into 2 parts.
  7. Gently roll each part into a long thick cylinder or rope.
  8. Wrap it up in the plastic sheet,foil or cling film.
  9. Leave the dough in the freezer for 30-45 minutes.
  10. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  11. Grease baking trays lightly with butter.
  12. Cut the dough into slices about ¼" thick.
  13. Bake the cookies for 8-10 minutes till the edges appear light brown.
  14. Remove the tray from the oven.
  15. Leave the cookies on the tray for 5 minutes.
  16. Then slowly remove them from the tray and let it cool on a wire rack.
  17. Store the cookies in an airtight jar.
Tips:
  • I had doubled the recipe, so I had four rolled parts. I left 2 in the fridge till I baked the other 2 first.
  • Use a sharp knife to cut the slices.
  • Don't over bake these cookies. At first they will appear soft but on cooling they become crunchy.
  • I used red and green cherries instead of tutti frutti. You can add any dried fruit or nuts of your choice.
  • Use rose essence instead of cardamom powder.
  • The number of cookies you get from the dough will depend on how thick or thin you roll the dough into a long rope or cylinder. I made small ones.
  • These cookies taste so delicious with masala tea.
You may want to check out the following:

thandai cookies
dark chocolate orange shortbread
If you want to join the group click here.



Monday, 15 August 2016

582. Gajar Halwa with Orange and Saffron (carrot halwa)

Vande Mataram

                         What does independence mean? According to the Cambridge dictionary it means freedom from being governed or ruled by another country. Independence means living a life without being influenced or helped by others. On 15th August, India will celebrate its 70th Independence Day or Swatantra din. India got its independence from the British Empire. With each Independence Day we are also reminded of the Partition of India and Pakistan. Every Independent country or State that looks after its citizens, makes its citizens to feel proud and patriotic. As an Indian born in Kenya, what are my feelings and thoughts for India? I am lucky to have a strong connection with India though having been brought up in Kenya. My mother was born and brought up in India. My father sent me to a boarding school in Mt.Abu when was only 12 (Uganda exodus scared all the Asian communities in East Africa). I got admission in Sophia High School in May and my first India Independence Day celebration was a memorable one.We had to wear our girl guide's uniform which was white salwar kameez with a blue dupatta and white tackies as we called them. The flag was hoisted and we sang the National Anthem and other patriotic songs. After the ceremony we all got nice orange laddoos and the rest of the day was spent with a trip to the town, good food and a sweet treat again in the evening. This whole experience had a great impact on me as it was the first such ceremony I participated in. Don't get me wrong Kenya too celebrates its Independence Day but normally during that time schools are on holiday (12th December). We would watch the President hoist the flag, sing the National Anthem and watch the parade on the television. My husband qualified as a doctor from India, my kids went to high school in India, my mother in law and daughter live in India, we visit India every year. There is something that beckons us to visit it ever so often.
                            Our#FoodieMonday#Bloghop group is celebrating Independence in style through food. Our 53rd theme is #tricolorteamrecipes. For this theme the members are divided into three groups:

Pushpita made Berma Bai Swtkwi Mosdeng
Saswati  made Zarda pulao
and I are in the Orange group. 


Wagmee made Triple C ladoo
Alka made Khira, 
and Sujata made Kesar Pista Sandesh
 are in the White group. 

Kriti made hara bhara seekh kebab
and Nisa made Peas coconut halwa
are in the green group. 

We all have to prepare a traditional dish according to our colour theme.You may be wondering why those colours. The tiranga or the Indian flag has a band of 3 equidistant colours. The orange, saffron or bhagwa colour on top denotes courage and sacrifice or selflessness. The white in the middle represents honesty, peace and purity and the green at the bottom symbolizes fertility or growth, vibrancy and prosperity. The Ashoka Chakra or Wheel of Law with 24 spokes appears in blue in the middle. To know more about the Indian flag read here.


        Before I introduce the recipe to you, I've got to explain what the above title Vande Mataram means. It means I pray/bow down to thee Mother. Here the reference is to our Motherland India. Many Indians living outside India still have a strong connection to the Motherland and feel proud to be Indians. Though to some this may appear as a split loyalty to India and Kenya, I believe that probably some of us are very fortunate to profess our loyalties to not one but two nations. This helps us to create a better understanding of different cultures and live in harmony with all. I bow down to my Motherland and my birthplace too.
                        I've been really busy this week with a Shrimad Bhagwat Saptah  so haven't been able to plan a proper India Independence Day theme.To celebrate India's Independence Day, here's a Gajar Halwa recipe with both orange and saffron flavours. The orange halwa is the main colour and by sprinkling almonds and pistachios on top I have incorporated the tiranga(tricolours) colours.





Gajar halwa served with walnut ice cream

GAJAR HALWA WITH ORANGE AND SAFFRON (Carrot Halwa)
Serves 4-6

500g (approx 4½ -5 cups)carrots peeled and finely grated
2 cups fresh whole milk
1 cup fresh orange juice
1½ cups white sugar
2 tbsp raisins
a few strands of saffron
¼ cup milk powder
2 tbsp ghee (clarified butter)
1 tbsp orange blossom water
1 tbsp chopped almond and pistachios for garnishing
1 tsp ghee (optional)


  1. Mix 1 tsp ghee(take from the measured ghee) into the milk powder. Add 1 tbsp milk(take from the measured milk) and mix into a crumbly consistency. This is homemade instant khoya (mawa). Leave on the side till required.
  2. Heat ghee in a pan. Add the grated carrots and stir fry for 5 minutes. At this stage the carrots will become a bit pale and soft.
  3. Add milk and saffron.Cook on medium heat, stirring frequently till the milk is reduced to half the quantity. This will take about 15-20 minutes.
  4. Add the milk powder mixture, orange juice and sugar. Mix well. At this stage the mixture will be very liquidy again.
  5. Cook the mixture further till no more liquid is left. This will take another 15-20 minutes. Stir frequently so that the mixture does not burn or stick to the bottom. When the halwa is done, the carrots will be cooked, and no liquid will be left in the pan. 
  6. At this stage add the raisins and extra 1 tsp ghee.Mix.
  7. Take the pan off the heat. Add the orange blossom water and mix well.
  8. Spoon the gajar halwa into serving bowls. Sprinkle the top with chopped almonds and pistachios.
  9. Serve hot gajar halwa. Another exciting and my favourite way to serve gajar halwa is with a dollop of ice cream. 
Tips:
  • To prepare normal gajar halwa add 1 cup of milk instead of orange juice and add cardamom powder instead of orange blossom water.
  • Slightly brown sugar will not give you the required orange colour, so use white sugar.
  • Don't cook the halwa over high heat.
  • Add ¼ cup fresh khoya or mawa instead of the milk powder.

Sending this recipe to the following event:

Blog Hop


                       
                             

Tuesday, 9 August 2016

581.Fatayer Jebneh(White cheese pastries)#BreadBakers

Fatayer Jebneh#BreadBakers

   Fatayer Jebneh  or cheese pastries are popular pastries sold in the Middle Eastern countries. They are called pastries or pies but unlike the western world pies which are made with flour and fat, these are made with a yeast dough. These pastries are popular street food served in Egypt, Lebanon and Middle East countries. The origin of these pastries is unknown as each country claims it as their own.
   The yeast dough has yogurt and baking powder added to it to make it soft. The filling for fatayer can be cheese (Jebneh), meat or spinach. The shape too varies. They can be cigar shaped, round, triangle or boat shaped.
   The cheese fatayers are usually filled with akkawi, a salty, chewy cheese that originates from Palestine mixed with a little bit of cheddar and kashkaval cheese. However if these cheeses are not available one can combine feta, mozzarella or ricotta with some cheddar cheese. Spices usually that are used to flavour the filling are nigella seeds or zaatar or a combination of cayenne and paprika powder. Herbs used are usually coriander, flat parsley or mint.
   I had this recipe bookmarked ever since I came across it on Saswan's blog 'Chef in Disguise'. Dinner guests and Sue of Palatable Pastime's suggestion to use any kind of peppers---fresh, dried, ground, sweet or hot, the three just fell into the slot perfectly. One more bookmarked recipe done, followed Sue's suggested theme for August and happy guests. What more can I ask for. Sue thank you for an interesting theme.
   Must admit when I read peppers for the Bread Bakers' theme, the Indian in me was calling out for a hot hot hot bread... not temperature wise but taste wise. However, had to hold back and just put a wee bit as kids too were my dinner guests.
    I used a combination of feta (as we don't get akkawi), mozzarella and cheddar cheese. I added both fresh coriander and mint to the filling and sprinkled a combination of cayenne and paprika powders along with some sesame seeds.










FATAYER JEBNEH (WHITE CHEESE PASTRIES)
Makes 10 big pieces or 24 small ones

For the dough (pastry):
3 cups plain flour (all purpose flour)
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup yogurt (room temperature)
1 tsp baking powder
1 tbsp instant dry active yeast
1 tsp sugar
½ tsp salt
¾ -1 cup warm water

For the filling:
100g feta cheese
100g mozzarella cheese
100g cheddar cheese
2-3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
1 tbsp chopped fresh mint
½ tsp cayenne pepper
2 tsp paprika powder
2 tbsp sesame seeds( or nigella seeds)
milk or olive oil for brushing

extra flour for dusting
extra oil for greasing

Preparation of the dough:
  1. Mix flour, salt, baking powder, sugar and yeast in a big bowl.
  2. Add olive oil and rub into the flour.
  3. Mix water and yogurt. Use the mixture to form a dough.
  4. Knead the dough till it becomes smooth and doesn't stick to your hands.
  5. Grease the bowl and dough with oil and cover it with a tea towel or cling film.
  6. Let the dough rise till double in size.
Preparation of the filling:
  1. Crumble or grate the feta cheese.
  2. Grate mozzarella and cheddar cheese.
  3. Mix the cheeses.
  4. Mix paprika and cayenne powders.
  5. Add coriander, mint and a bit of the mixed pepper powder to the cheese.
  6. Mix well.
Preparation of the fatayer:
  1. Divide the dough into 20 parts. Roll each part into a ball.
  2. Using a bit of extra flour roll one part into a 8cm X 10cm oval.
  3. Put a tablespoonful of the filling in the middle.
  4. Fold one edge of  partially over the filling.
  5. Fold the other part but not covering the filling. The ends of both folds should overlap.
  6. Press the ends.It should look like a boat.
  7. Repeat steps 2-6 with the remaining dough balls.
  8. Place the fatayer on a greased or lined baking tray.
  9. Let the dough rise for 20-25 minutes.
  10. Preheat the oven to 180° C.
  11. Brush the tops of the fatayer with milk or olive oil.
  12. Sprinkle sesame seeds over the dough part.
  13. Bake the fatayers for 15-20 minutes or till they are light golden in colour.
  14. Remove the fatayers from the oven and cool them on the wire rack.
  15. Sprinkle the remaining paprika cayenne powder mixture over the cheese part while still hot.
  16. Enjoy them with mint tea, coffee or some soup.
Tips:
  • Adding yogurt and baking powder makes the dough more soft and pliable.
  • Shape them into triangles, round or cigar shapes.
  • Use zaatar instead of the coriander and mint. Can use dried coriander and mint.
  • Add the pepper powders according to your taste. I used half quantity in the filling and half to sprinkle over. My cayenne pepper was not too hot.
Check out what other bakers have made using pepper:
BreadBakers
#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.

We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com.





Monday, 8 August 2016

580. Makhana and Paneer Salad

Satvik Food

  According to the Ayurveda(Indian traditional medicine), food is divided into 3 main groups, Satvik (Satvic), Tamasic and Rajasic. Food not only nourishes the body but affects the mind too. In this fast paced world our food is not only loaded with chemicals through fertilizers, canning, processing but we tend to overindulge in fast foods that are bad for our body, mind and health.We all get tempted by cheesy pizzas, delish bakes, silky chocolates.
  Satvik foods are smooth, savory, easy to digest, light and fresh. Satvik foods encourage mental clarity, good health and peace.Foods belonging to this group are rich in Prana(life force). Foods included in this category are basically lacto vegetarian foods like fresh fruits, vegetables, fresh diary products, grains and pulses, natural sugars, nuts and seeds.Consuming these foods balances out the destructive gunas and keeps our mind calm, positive and healthy. Following a satvik diet eliminates the Tamasic and Rajasic guna within us.
 Rajasic foods are pungent, spicy, salty, sour, stimulants and irritants. Consummation of foods belonging to this category like hot spices, strong herbs, caffeinated drinks, chocolates, plants belonging to the onion and garlic family are not good if over consumed. Its causes one to become angry, agitated, assertive and sometimes hostile.
 Tamasic foods are heavy, dull, tasteless,old, rotten, depressing and foul in nature. Foods belonging to this group like meats, fish, eggs, alcohol, processed foods,tobbaco, vinegar, preserved foods, fatty foods,  causes one to become lethargic, dull and lead a stagnant life.
  
To encourage a Satvik diet there are certain rules that one needs to follow:
1) Avoid foods that are overcooked, undercooked, burnt or that are stale.
2)No meat, fish, eggs
3) No stimulants like alcohol, tobbaco, drugs, caffeine.
4) Don't eat food cooked in the microwave.
5) Don't eat refined foods, like white flour, white sugar, canned foods.
6) Always eat while sitting down and don't rush through your meal. No TV meals.
7) Consume fried foods in moderation.
8) Make healthy choices.
9) Exercise and meditate.
  The holy month of Shravan encourages Hindus to follow a satvik diet. During this month prayers are offered to Lord Shiva, many festivals take place during this period and devotees fast the whole month. Some follow a strict diet of of only fruits and milk, some do not consume any grains, lentils, beans and pulses during this period and some eat a normal satvik meal only once a day. During this month Hindus avoid meat, fish, eggs, alcohol, tobacco, onions and garlic. Some don't even consume hing (asafoetida).

Image result for sattvic rajasic and tamasic food
copied from google.
  For our 52nd theme On #FoodieMonday#Bloghop we decided to prepare #Satvikfood. I decided to prepare a salad, keeping the satvik foods in mind. This salad can be eaten during the fasting month of Shravan and also during Ekadashi. I used paneer and makhana as the main ingredients. Makhana is  fox nut or gorgon nut, a white seed from the prickly water lily plant.They are a good source of protein, fiber, magnesium, potassium,iron, zinc and phosphorus.According to Ayurveda makhana has the property of restoring vital energy in the body and is good for kidney functions.In India fox nut is usually roasted or fried and added to curries, kheers or eaten as a snack.








MAKHANA AND PANEER SALAD
For 2

1 cup makhana (fox nuts)
100g (approx ½ cup) paneer cubes
1 small cucumber
½ cup red(yellow or orange) pepper cut into slices
8-10 cherry or plum tomatoes
8-10 almonds
8-10 cashew nuts
10-12 grapes
8-10 mint leaves
2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
1 green chilli, cut into rings
½ tsp ginger slivers
¼ tsp red chilli powder
½ tsp cumin powder (jeera powder)
½ -1 tsp amchur powder (dry mango powder)
½ tsp sendhu salt (or sea salt or Himalaya rock salt)
¼ tsp coarse pepper powder
2 tbsp oil
1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)

  1. Heat one tbsp oil in a pan over medium heat. Add makhana and roast for 1-2 minutes, stirring all the time till they become crunchy. Remove the makhana from the pan and leave it on the side till required. Store the makhana in an air tight container when it becomes cool. 
  2. Heat the remaining oil. Add cumin seed, chilli and ginger. Add paneer, almonds, cashew nuts and chopped pepper.Saute till the pepper is just a bit soft but crunchy and the paneer is lightly browned.
  3. Let the mixture cool down completely.
  4. Cut tomatoes and grapes into halves. Add to the cooled paneer mixture.
  5. Cut cucumber into thin wedges and add to the mixture.
  6. Add mint and coriander leaves, cumin powder, salt, pepper, amchur and chilli powders.
  7. Add makhana just before serving. Mix well and serve immediately.
Tips:
  • Use lemon juice instead of amchur powder.
  • Use ghee(clarified butter) instead of oil if you consume oil during fasting.
  • Add fruits of your choice.
  • Remember to add fried makhana just before serving otherwise they will become soggy.
  • Roast the nuts instead of stir frying in oil.
You may want to check out the following fasting food recipes :
Farali dokhra
Ekadashi thepla
Sabudana Kheer

Sending this recipe for the following event:

Blog Hop

Monday, 22 August 2016

584. Dulce de leche baked yogurt(Bhapa Doi)

Hey anand umang bhayo, jai ho Nandlal ki,Nand ke anand bhayo, jai Kanhiya lal ki
    
   Hindus all over the world will celebrate Janmashtami, Gokulashtami, Krishna Jayanti, Ashtami Rohini as its known on Thursday 25th August this year. What is Janmashtami? Janmashtami is the birthday of Lord Krishna. Lord Krishna is the eighth avatar(incarnation) of Lord Vishnu. He took the human form and came to this earth over 5000years ago, 5243 to be exact to vanquish evil and bring back faith in religion. Its believed that Lord Krishna was born at midnight. He was the eighth son of Devaki and Vasudev(of the Yadava dynasty) from Mathura. His maternal uncle Kansa (Devaki's brother) ascended the throne by imprisoning his father King Ugrasena.King Kansa was a tyrant. After hearing a prophesy by the heavenly voice that the eighth son of Devaki would kill him, Kansa imprisoned his sister Devaki and her husband Vasudev. Kansa killed the previous children born to Devaki. It is believed that when Krishna was to be born, all the people in the palace and Mathura fell into deep sleep except for Devaki and Vasudev. As soon as Krishna was born, the prison gates opened and Vasudev was instructed by the Supreme voice to take baby Krishna to Gokul village and place in the crib at Nanda and Yashoda's house. That same day, Yashoda had given birth to a girl who is believed to be Goddess Durga herself. Vasudev left baby (Bal) Krishna at Nanda's house and brought back the girl to Mathura. When everyone woke up from the deep sleep, Kansa immediately went to the prison to kill the eighth son. But instead he found a girl. But just that the prophesy doesn't come true, he tried to kill the girl who slipped away from his hands and went towards the heaven. But also warned that Kansa that his vanquisher had already taken birth. 



      Lord Krishna was raised by his foster parents Nanda and Yashoda. Kansa was killed by Lord Krishna as prophesied but his work was not done as yet. As we read the Srimad Bhagavatam(Bhagavata Purana), Lord Krishna had lots of work to do to restore faith and vanquish evil. Its not really possible for me to write about all His work here, but for every Hindu Lord Krishna's birth is of great importance.
    To celebrate this auspicious day, people usually fast the whole day. Some take no water, some take water only and others fast by not eating any grains and pulses. Around midnight puja is performed, bhajans(hymns) are sung praising Krishna and around midnight His birth is celebrated with much pomp, songs and dance. After that abhishek(bathing and dressing up the Lord) is performed. A variety of food is offered the Lord as bhog and finally people break their fast by taking prasad (the offering). Some break the fast the next day at sunrise. 
    Bal Gopal (Krishna is known by 108 different names) as a small child loved milk, yogurt(dahi) and butter(makhan). He would 'steal' makhan or dahi from the pots of the gopis home. To celebrate his childhood pastimes, usually a pot of yogurt is hung high up. Then young boys form a huge pyramid and get a young boy to break the pot with a stick. This ritual and a fun time for all is performed after Janmashtami.


    To celebrate this Janmashtami with my #FoodieMonday#Bloghop friends, I have prepared baked yogurt or Bhapa Doi as an offering for our 54th theme #Janmashtami. It has cream, milk and yogurt which all are Bal Gopal's favourite. I flavoured the baked yogurt with dulce de leche(milk jam or condensed milk heated till it turns brown). I've always wanted to baked yogurt since the first time I tasted it as prasadam at my sister in law's house in Mumbai. She and her husband are both devotees of ISKCON and there's never a time when there is no prasad (offering) at their home. They tend to get prasad through other devotees from all over India. Bhapa doi was one such prasad sent all the way from Kolkata. Here's my recipe for dulce de leche baked yogurt.














DULCE DE LECHE BAKED YOGURT
Makes 6
food photography: Namrata Patel

½-¾ cup sweetened condensed milk
1 cup hung yogurt* or greek yogurt
1 cup fresh cream (or milk)
a few strands of saffron (kesar)
2-3 tbsp dulce de leche

For topping:
Mixed chopped nuts ( I used hazelnuts, walnuts, almonds and pistachios)
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. 
  2. Take 6 ramekin bowls or earthenware bowls.
  3. Place them in an ovenproof deep tray.
  4. Whisk sweetened condensed milk, cream and thick yogurt together.
  5. Add saffron and mix.
  6. Pour the mixture equally into the bowls. Fill them ¾ full.
  7. Pour water in the tray till it reaches halfway around the bowls.
  8. Place the tray with the bowls in the oven.
  9. Bake the yogurt for 10-15 minutes or till a toothpick inserted in the yogurt comes out clean.
  10. Take the tray out of the oven. 
  11. Let the baked yogurt cool down.
  12. Put it in the fridge till required.
  13. Sprinkle nuts or fruits on top and serve.
Tips:
  • * Put about 1½ cups of fresh yogurt in a muslin cloth or cotton cloth. Hang it over the kitchen tap or place the cloth in a strainer. Let the water from the yogurt drain out for 20-30 minutes. 
  • If you don't want to use dulce de leche, flavour it with spices or fruit purees of your choice.
  • Use only ½ cup of sweetened condensed milk if you don't want the baked yogurt too sweet.
  • Top the yogurt with nuts, fruits, or even compote.
  • Don't over bake it.
  • Remember to use ovenproof bowls and tray.
  • For a lighter dessert, replace the cream with milk.
  • If you don't have individual bowls you can use a small ovenproof tray (8"X8"). Cut the baked yogurt into pieces and serve.
  • To prepare dulce de leche read here.
You may want to check out the following:
samo/moriyo kheer
beetroot halwa
shrikhand
kalakand

Sending this recipe for the following event:
Blog Hop

       
Pin It

Tuesday, 16 August 2016

583. Karachi Cookies

Only Bakes Challenge#1

   I love baking mostly breads,cakes, muffins and cookies, a few pies and adding to the list a new passion, scones. To share my love for baking I started ONLY BAKES group on Facebook. I invited my family members, friends and a few blogger friends to join the group. I started the group in February 2016. Initially I had just a handful of people who joined the group. Slowly, some members and blogger friends like Saswati, Jolly, Nisa, Gayathri, Shobha,Avin, Latha began to post their bakes on the page. For a couple of months I thought,"Gosh, I've started a group and its got just a few members.' Then suddenly membership requests began to pour in and now there's no looking back. Right now as I write this post we have over 6000 members. I find that some members share really interesting bakes, some are very creative and some just want to collect all the recipes in the world. 
  At this point I would like to mention that even though we are members of many groups on Facebook, etiquette still has to be maintained. Some forget words like please and thank you and demand a recipe. Its very disheartening to see in the comment section of a photo or recipe you have posted, rcp.... I didn't even understand that till my neighbour mentioned that it means recipe!! I was totally taken aback. No nice words or anything! Its always nice to encourage people who have taken time to prepare, photograph and share a recipe by commenting. This encourages them to share more with you. Learning from young or old should never stop. No one on this earth is born knowing everything. Learning from others is a satisfyingand uplifting experience.
  Since a lot of the members were asking for recipes which is not a criteria for posting on ONLY BAKES, I decided to start a monthly challenge. This would also help new bakers to build up their confidence and bake new things, baking together is enjoyable and sharing what others have baked is fun. 
  Vandana Jangid a member in the group baked Karachi cookies, photographed and posted it.  They looked absolutely tempting and yummy. I read the recipe and it was very easy to bake them. So I set Karachi Cookies or biscuits as they are called as the challenge. Thank you so much Vandana Jangid for sharing the recipe with the group.
   Karachi cookies or biscuits are not from Karachi at all. They are very famous cookies baked at the Karachi Bakery in Hyderabad. Khanchand Ramnani, a Sindhi who migrated from Karachi to Hyderabad in 1947, started Karchi Bakery. He set up the first shop in Moazzam Jahi Market and till date has many branches not only in Hyderabad but also in Dubai, Mumbai, Vizag. 
    What's so good about these cookies? Well firstly these buttery cookies do not contain any baking agent. Secondly they are fruity. Tutti frutti is added to the dough, speckles of red, green , yellow show up against the light cream background. Nowadays other dried fruits too are added like raisins, currants, cranberries and nuts too. Rose essence is added to the dough to give it an exotic taste but some prefer cardamom. 
     When baking these cookies, I found that once the ingredients at hand, they are the easiest and most delicious cookies to bake.








KARACHI COOKIES/BISCUITS
Makes about 20 pieces
Recipe source : Vandana Jangid

1 cup plain flour (all purpose flour, maida)
100g (5 tbsp) butter, at room temperature
½ cup powdered sugar
½ tsp cardamom powder (elachi powder)
1 tbsp milk
⅓ cup tutti frutti

  1. Put butter and sugar in a big bowl. Cream sugar and butter with a whip or spoon till it becomes soft and appears a little white.
  2. Add the cardamom powder and milk. Mix well.
  3. Add the flour and mix with a spoon till a soft dough is formed. The dough will appear too soft.
  4. Let the dough rest for 5 minutes.
  5. In the meantime get the cling film,foil or plastic sheets ready to wrap the dough.
  6. Divide the dough into 2 parts.
  7. Gently roll each part into a long thick cylinder or rope.
  8. Wrap it up in the plastic sheet,foil or cling film.
  9. Leave the dough in the freezer for 30-45 minutes.
  10. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  11. Grease baking trays lightly with butter.
  12. Cut the dough into slices about ¼" thick.
  13. Bake the cookies for 8-10 minutes till the edges appear light brown.
  14. Remove the tray from the oven.
  15. Leave the cookies on the tray for 5 minutes.
  16. Then slowly remove them from the tray and let it cool on a wire rack.
  17. Store the cookies in an airtight jar.
Tips:
  • I had doubled the recipe, so I had four rolled parts. I left 2 in the fridge till I baked the other 2 first.
  • Use a sharp knife to cut the slices.
  • Don't over bake these cookies. At first they will appear soft but on cooling they become crunchy.
  • I used red and green cherries instead of tutti frutti. You can add any dried fruit or nuts of your choice.
  • Use rose essence instead of cardamom powder.
  • The number of cookies you get from the dough will depend on how thick or thin you roll the dough into a long rope or cylinder. I made small ones.
  • These cookies taste so delicious with masala tea.
You may want to check out the following:

thandai cookies
dark chocolate orange shortbread
If you want to join the group click here.



Pin It

Monday, 15 August 2016

582. Gajar Halwa with Orange and Saffron (carrot halwa)

Vande Mataram

                         What does independence mean? According to the Cambridge dictionary it means freedom from being governed or ruled by another country. Independence means living a life without being influenced or helped by others. On 15th August, India will celebrate its 70th Independence Day or Swatantra din. India got its independence from the British Empire. With each Independence Day we are also reminded of the Partition of India and Pakistan. Every Independent country or State that looks after its citizens, makes its citizens to feel proud and patriotic. As an Indian born in Kenya, what are my feelings and thoughts for India? I am lucky to have a strong connection with India though having been brought up in Kenya. My mother was born and brought up in India. My father sent me to a boarding school in Mt.Abu when was only 12 (Uganda exodus scared all the Asian communities in East Africa). I got admission in Sophia High School in May and my first India Independence Day celebration was a memorable one.We had to wear our girl guide's uniform which was white salwar kameez with a blue dupatta and white tackies as we called them. The flag was hoisted and we sang the National Anthem and other patriotic songs. After the ceremony we all got nice orange laddoos and the rest of the day was spent with a trip to the town, good food and a sweet treat again in the evening. This whole experience had a great impact on me as it was the first such ceremony I participated in. Don't get me wrong Kenya too celebrates its Independence Day but normally during that time schools are on holiday (12th December). We would watch the President hoist the flag, sing the National Anthem and watch the parade on the television. My husband qualified as a doctor from India, my kids went to high school in India, my mother in law and daughter live in India, we visit India every year. There is something that beckons us to visit it ever so often.
                            Our#FoodieMonday#Bloghop group is celebrating Independence in style through food. Our 53rd theme is #tricolorteamrecipes. For this theme the members are divided into three groups:

Pushpita made Berma Bai Swtkwi Mosdeng
Saswati  made Zarda pulao
and I are in the Orange group. 


Wagmee made Triple C ladoo
Alka made Khira, 
and Sujata made Kesar Pista Sandesh
 are in the White group. 

Kriti made hara bhara seekh kebab
and Nisa made Peas coconut halwa
are in the green group. 

We all have to prepare a traditional dish according to our colour theme.You may be wondering why those colours. The tiranga or the Indian flag has a band of 3 equidistant colours. The orange, saffron or bhagwa colour on top denotes courage and sacrifice or selflessness. The white in the middle represents honesty, peace and purity and the green at the bottom symbolizes fertility or growth, vibrancy and prosperity. The Ashoka Chakra or Wheel of Law with 24 spokes appears in blue in the middle. To know more about the Indian flag read here.


        Before I introduce the recipe to you, I've got to explain what the above title Vande Mataram means. It means I pray/bow down to thee Mother. Here the reference is to our Motherland India. Many Indians living outside India still have a strong connection to the Motherland and feel proud to be Indians. Though to some this may appear as a split loyalty to India and Kenya, I believe that probably some of us are very fortunate to profess our loyalties to not one but two nations. This helps us to create a better understanding of different cultures and live in harmony with all. I bow down to my Motherland and my birthplace too.
                        I've been really busy this week with a Shrimad Bhagwat Saptah  so haven't been able to plan a proper India Independence Day theme.To celebrate India's Independence Day, here's a Gajar Halwa recipe with both orange and saffron flavours. The orange halwa is the main colour and by sprinkling almonds and pistachios on top I have incorporated the tiranga(tricolours) colours.





Gajar halwa served with walnut ice cream

GAJAR HALWA WITH ORANGE AND SAFFRON (Carrot Halwa)
Serves 4-6

500g (approx 4½ -5 cups)carrots peeled and finely grated
2 cups fresh whole milk
1 cup fresh orange juice
1½ cups white sugar
2 tbsp raisins
a few strands of saffron
¼ cup milk powder
2 tbsp ghee (clarified butter)
1 tbsp orange blossom water
1 tbsp chopped almond and pistachios for garnishing
1 tsp ghee (optional)


  1. Mix 1 tsp ghee(take from the measured ghee) into the milk powder. Add 1 tbsp milk(take from the measured milk) and mix into a crumbly consistency. This is homemade instant khoya (mawa). Leave on the side till required.
  2. Heat ghee in a pan. Add the grated carrots and stir fry for 5 minutes. At this stage the carrots will become a bit pale and soft.
  3. Add milk and saffron.Cook on medium heat, stirring frequently till the milk is reduced to half the quantity. This will take about 15-20 minutes.
  4. Add the milk powder mixture, orange juice and sugar. Mix well. At this stage the mixture will be very liquidy again.
  5. Cook the mixture further till no more liquid is left. This will take another 15-20 minutes. Stir frequently so that the mixture does not burn or stick to the bottom. When the halwa is done, the carrots will be cooked, and no liquid will be left in the pan. 
  6. At this stage add the raisins and extra 1 tsp ghee.Mix.
  7. Take the pan off the heat. Add the orange blossom water and mix well.
  8. Spoon the gajar halwa into serving bowls. Sprinkle the top with chopped almonds and pistachios.
  9. Serve hot gajar halwa. Another exciting and my favourite way to serve gajar halwa is with a dollop of ice cream. 
Tips:
  • To prepare normal gajar halwa add 1 cup of milk instead of orange juice and add cardamom powder instead of orange blossom water.
  • Slightly brown sugar will not give you the required orange colour, so use white sugar.
  • Don't cook the halwa over high heat.
  • Add ¼ cup fresh khoya or mawa instead of the milk powder.

Sending this recipe to the following event:

Blog Hop


                       
                             
Pin It

Tuesday, 9 August 2016

581.Fatayer Jebneh(White cheese pastries)#BreadBakers

Fatayer Jebneh#BreadBakers

   Fatayer Jebneh  or cheese pastries are popular pastries sold in the Middle Eastern countries. They are called pastries or pies but unlike the western world pies which are made with flour and fat, these are made with a yeast dough. These pastries are popular street food served in Egypt, Lebanon and Middle East countries. The origin of these pastries is unknown as each country claims it as their own.
   The yeast dough has yogurt and baking powder added to it to make it soft. The filling for fatayer can be cheese (Jebneh), meat or spinach. The shape too varies. They can be cigar shaped, round, triangle or boat shaped.
   The cheese fatayers are usually filled with akkawi, a salty, chewy cheese that originates from Palestine mixed with a little bit of cheddar and kashkaval cheese. However if these cheeses are not available one can combine feta, mozzarella or ricotta with some cheddar cheese. Spices usually that are used to flavour the filling are nigella seeds or zaatar or a combination of cayenne and paprika powder. Herbs used are usually coriander, flat parsley or mint.
   I had this recipe bookmarked ever since I came across it on Saswan's blog 'Chef in Disguise'. Dinner guests and Sue of Palatable Pastime's suggestion to use any kind of peppers---fresh, dried, ground, sweet or hot, the three just fell into the slot perfectly. One more bookmarked recipe done, followed Sue's suggested theme for August and happy guests. What more can I ask for. Sue thank you for an interesting theme.
   Must admit when I read peppers for the Bread Bakers' theme, the Indian in me was calling out for a hot hot hot bread... not temperature wise but taste wise. However, had to hold back and just put a wee bit as kids too were my dinner guests.
    I used a combination of feta (as we don't get akkawi), mozzarella and cheddar cheese. I added both fresh coriander and mint to the filling and sprinkled a combination of cayenne and paprika powders along with some sesame seeds.










FATAYER JEBNEH (WHITE CHEESE PASTRIES)
Makes 10 big pieces or 24 small ones

For the dough (pastry):
3 cups plain flour (all purpose flour)
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup yogurt (room temperature)
1 tsp baking powder
1 tbsp instant dry active yeast
1 tsp sugar
½ tsp salt
¾ -1 cup warm water

For the filling:
100g feta cheese
100g mozzarella cheese
100g cheddar cheese
2-3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
1 tbsp chopped fresh mint
½ tsp cayenne pepper
2 tsp paprika powder
2 tbsp sesame seeds( or nigella seeds)
milk or olive oil for brushing

extra flour for dusting
extra oil for greasing

Preparation of the dough:
  1. Mix flour, salt, baking powder, sugar and yeast in a big bowl.
  2. Add olive oil and rub into the flour.
  3. Mix water and yogurt. Use the mixture to form a dough.
  4. Knead the dough till it becomes smooth and doesn't stick to your hands.
  5. Grease the bowl and dough with oil and cover it with a tea towel or cling film.
  6. Let the dough rise till double in size.
Preparation of the filling:
  1. Crumble or grate the feta cheese.
  2. Grate mozzarella and cheddar cheese.
  3. Mix the cheeses.
  4. Mix paprika and cayenne powders.
  5. Add coriander, mint and a bit of the mixed pepper powder to the cheese.
  6. Mix well.
Preparation of the fatayer:
  1. Divide the dough into 20 parts. Roll each part into a ball.
  2. Using a bit of extra flour roll one part into a 8cm X 10cm oval.
  3. Put a tablespoonful of the filling in the middle.
  4. Fold one edge of  partially over the filling.
  5. Fold the other part but not covering the filling. The ends of both folds should overlap.
  6. Press the ends.It should look like a boat.
  7. Repeat steps 2-6 with the remaining dough balls.
  8. Place the fatayer on a greased or lined baking tray.
  9. Let the dough rise for 20-25 minutes.
  10. Preheat the oven to 180° C.
  11. Brush the tops of the fatayer with milk or olive oil.
  12. Sprinkle sesame seeds over the dough part.
  13. Bake the fatayers for 15-20 minutes or till they are light golden in colour.
  14. Remove the fatayers from the oven and cool them on the wire rack.
  15. Sprinkle the remaining paprika cayenne powder mixture over the cheese part while still hot.
  16. Enjoy them with mint tea, coffee or some soup.
Tips:
  • Adding yogurt and baking powder makes the dough more soft and pliable.
  • Shape them into triangles, round or cigar shapes.
  • Use zaatar instead of the coriander and mint. Can use dried coriander and mint.
  • Add the pepper powders according to your taste. I used half quantity in the filling and half to sprinkle over. My cayenne pepper was not too hot.
Check out what other bakers have made using pepper:
BreadBakers
#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.

We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.

If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com.





Pin It

Monday, 8 August 2016

580. Makhana and Paneer Salad

Satvik Food

  According to the Ayurveda(Indian traditional medicine), food is divided into 3 main groups, Satvik (Satvic), Tamasic and Rajasic. Food not only nourishes the body but affects the mind too. In this fast paced world our food is not only loaded with chemicals through fertilizers, canning, processing but we tend to overindulge in fast foods that are bad for our body, mind and health.We all get tempted by cheesy pizzas, delish bakes, silky chocolates.
  Satvik foods are smooth, savory, easy to digest, light and fresh. Satvik foods encourage mental clarity, good health and peace.Foods belonging to this group are rich in Prana(life force). Foods included in this category are basically lacto vegetarian foods like fresh fruits, vegetables, fresh diary products, grains and pulses, natural sugars, nuts and seeds.Consuming these foods balances out the destructive gunas and keeps our mind calm, positive and healthy. Following a satvik diet eliminates the Tamasic and Rajasic guna within us.
 Rajasic foods are pungent, spicy, salty, sour, stimulants and irritants. Consummation of foods belonging to this category like hot spices, strong herbs, caffeinated drinks, chocolates, plants belonging to the onion and garlic family are not good if over consumed. Its causes one to become angry, agitated, assertive and sometimes hostile.
 Tamasic foods are heavy, dull, tasteless,old, rotten, depressing and foul in nature. Foods belonging to this group like meats, fish, eggs, alcohol, processed foods,tobbaco, vinegar, preserved foods, fatty foods,  causes one to become lethargic, dull and lead a stagnant life.
  
To encourage a Satvik diet there are certain rules that one needs to follow:
1) Avoid foods that are overcooked, undercooked, burnt or that are stale.
2)No meat, fish, eggs
3) No stimulants like alcohol, tobbaco, drugs, caffeine.
4) Don't eat food cooked in the microwave.
5) Don't eat refined foods, like white flour, white sugar, canned foods.
6) Always eat while sitting down and don't rush through your meal. No TV meals.
7) Consume fried foods in moderation.
8) Make healthy choices.
9) Exercise and meditate.
  The holy month of Shravan encourages Hindus to follow a satvik diet. During this month prayers are offered to Lord Shiva, many festivals take place during this period and devotees fast the whole month. Some follow a strict diet of of only fruits and milk, some do not consume any grains, lentils, beans and pulses during this period and some eat a normal satvik meal only once a day. During this month Hindus avoid meat, fish, eggs, alcohol, tobacco, onions and garlic. Some don't even consume hing (asafoetida).

Image result for sattvic rajasic and tamasic food
copied from google.
  For our 52nd theme On #FoodieMonday#Bloghop we decided to prepare #Satvikfood. I decided to prepare a salad, keeping the satvik foods in mind. This salad can be eaten during the fasting month of Shravan and also during Ekadashi. I used paneer and makhana as the main ingredients. Makhana is  fox nut or gorgon nut, a white seed from the prickly water lily plant.They are a good source of protein, fiber, magnesium, potassium,iron, zinc and phosphorus.According to Ayurveda makhana has the property of restoring vital energy in the body and is good for kidney functions.In India fox nut is usually roasted or fried and added to curries, kheers or eaten as a snack.








MAKHANA AND PANEER SALAD
For 2

1 cup makhana (fox nuts)
100g (approx ½ cup) paneer cubes
1 small cucumber
½ cup red(yellow or orange) pepper cut into slices
8-10 cherry or plum tomatoes
8-10 almonds
8-10 cashew nuts
10-12 grapes
8-10 mint leaves
2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
1 green chilli, cut into rings
½ tsp ginger slivers
¼ tsp red chilli powder
½ tsp cumin powder (jeera powder)
½ -1 tsp amchur powder (dry mango powder)
½ tsp sendhu salt (or sea salt or Himalaya rock salt)
¼ tsp coarse pepper powder
2 tbsp oil
1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)

  1. Heat one tbsp oil in a pan over medium heat. Add makhana and roast for 1-2 minutes, stirring all the time till they become crunchy. Remove the makhana from the pan and leave it on the side till required. Store the makhana in an air tight container when it becomes cool. 
  2. Heat the remaining oil. Add cumin seed, chilli and ginger. Add paneer, almonds, cashew nuts and chopped pepper.Saute till the pepper is just a bit soft but crunchy and the paneer is lightly browned.
  3. Let the mixture cool down completely.
  4. Cut tomatoes and grapes into halves. Add to the cooled paneer mixture.
  5. Cut cucumber into thin wedges and add to the mixture.
  6. Add mint and coriander leaves, cumin powder, salt, pepper, amchur and chilli powders.
  7. Add makhana just before serving. Mix well and serve immediately.
Tips:
  • Use lemon juice instead of amchur powder.
  • Use ghee(clarified butter) instead of oil if you consume oil during fasting.
  • Add fruits of your choice.
  • Remember to add fried makhana just before serving otherwise they will become soggy.
  • Roast the nuts instead of stir frying in oil.
You may want to check out the following fasting food recipes :
Farali dokhra
Ekadashi thepla
Sabudana Kheer

Sending this recipe for the following event:

Blog Hop
Pin It