Monday, 21 November 2016

599. Shahi Mushroom Korma

A rich cuisine

       Every week my blogging scene is a bit like the following - try and prepare and write out the post before or on Monday. I wait impatiently to see what the rest of the #FoodieMonday #Bloghop members have made pertaining to the chosen theme, then I visit the posts and comment on them. Tuesday the group whatsapp goes all haywire as we try and decide on the theme. So basically we get 5 days to prepare the dish. But 5 days just fly and by Sunday I'm thinking "oh dear my dish is not ready". Then its like a storm in the kitchen. Well that's the scene nowadays till my daughter gets married. When I'm in Mombasa I usually have the dish ready before Saturday as usually hubby and I go to our beach apartment to spend the weekend. 
      Coming to our #67th theme for the #FoodieMonday#Bloghop, we decided to explore the #Mughlai cuisine. We all make something or the other with rich gravy or exotic biryanis, succulent kebabs without giving it much thought. However, when we decided on Mughlai cuisine, that's the time I actually had to research what is really means. 
       Mughlai cuisine is basically food prepared with a variety of aromatic spices varying from slightly mild to spicy. This cuisine was introduced to India by the Mughal Empire. It is believed that when they came to India, they were not happy with the food prepared locally and they introduced a lot of spices, nuts, fruits and cooking methods. Mughals being Muslims, most of the dishes were meat based and some vegetables were added to enhance the preparation. Most of the dishes are either of Turkic or Persian origins. 
      Muglai food basically consists of main dishes accompanied by side dishes. Biryanis, kebabs, kormas (qorma), koftas, naans are a part of the Mughlai cuisine. Compared to other cuisines of India, Mughlai gravy dishes are rich in spices, nuts, dairy products and thick and creamy. Vegetables and paneer were introduced into the Mughlai cuisine to suit the vegetarian palate. That does not mean that the Mughals didn't have a palate for sweets or desserts. Most famous Mughlai dessert or sweet preparations are Shahi Tukra, Sheer Korma, Falooda, Kalakand, Anjeer halwa to name a few.
    I decided to make Shahi Mushroom Korma for this theme. So what is korma(kurvama, qorma,kurma, khorma)? Basically the meat is braised(cooked at hight heat dry or with liquid) and then added to the gravy and cooked over low heat. A mixture of spices are added to the korma along with yogurt and cream. Once the dairy product is added, the cooking temperature is controlled so that the cream or yogurt does not curdle. Shahi means royal and the dish has cream and nuts and sometimes fruits too. Being a vegetarian I decided to make the korma using mushrooms.







SHAHI MUSHROOM KORMA
Serves 2

200g mushrooms
1 large onion
1 tsp garlic paste
1 tsp ginger paste
1 tsp green chilli paste
½ cup beaten yogurt
½ cup fresh cream or coconut cream
½ cup water
¼ cup cashew nuts
¼ cup almonds
1 tbsp poppy seeds (khus khus)
1 tbsp char magaz seeds (melon seeds)
2 tbsp hot milk
a few strands of saffron
¼ tsp turmeric powder (haldi)
1 tbsp kasuri methi
3 tbsp ghee (clarified butter)
¾-1 tsp salt

For the korma spice:
1 one inch cinnamon stick
3-4 cloves
2 green cardamom (elachi)
1 strand mace (javantri)
1 bay leaf
1 black cardamom (bada elachi)
½ tsp fennel seeds (valiyari)
½ tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
1 tsp coriander seeds
6 pepper corns

For garnishing:
4-6 cashew nuts
4-6 almonds
4-6 pistachios
6-8 raisins

Preparation of the korma spice mixture:

  1. Dry roast the spices in a wide pan over low heat till the cumin begins to crackle. Make sure you stir the spices constantly.
  2. Take the pan off the heat. Spread the roasted spices in a plate to cool.
  3. Grind the spices in coffee grinder or dry grinder.
  4. Keep the korma spice on the side till required.
Preparation of the korma:
  1. Soak the saffron in hot milk.
  2. Wash and wipe the mushrooms. Cut them into halves or quarters depending on the size.
  3. Peel and cut the onion into chunks. Grind it to a paste.
  4. Roast  the cashew nuts, almonds, poppy seeds and melon seeds in a pan over low heat till the poppy seeds begin to pop. Stir the mixture constantly. Let the mixture cool down a bit and then grind it into a powder.
  5. Heat 1 tbsp ghee in a pan over low heat. Add the cashew nuts, almonds, pistachios and raisins. Fry for a few seconds. Remove the nuts and raisins and keep on the side.
  6. Add 1 tbsp ghee to the pan and stir fry the mushrooms over hight heat for 2-3 minutes. Stir the mushrooms frequently.
  7. Remove the mushrooms from the pan and keep it on the side till required.
  8. Add the remaining ghee to the pan.
  9. Add the onion paste and cook till it becomes light pink.
  10. Add garlic, ginger and chilli paste and stir fry for a few seconds.
  11. Add the nut powder. Mix well. Add water and mix till the mixture appears creamy.
  12. Add 1 tsp of the korma spice, turmeric powder, soaked saffron along with the milk and yogurt. Mix well.
  13. Add the mushrooms and salt. Mix well. Cover the pan and let the mushrooms simmer in the sauce over low heat for 10 minutes.
  14. Add kasuri methi and cream and mix well. cook it for 2-3 minutes.
  15. Put the shahi mushroom korma in a serving bowl.
  16. Garnish with the fried nuts and raisins and serve with naans, rice, rotis or parathas.
Tips:
  • Add the korma spice according to your taste.
  • Add vegetables or paneer along with mushrooms if you like.
  • Can add either cream or coconut cream to the korma.
  • Add a bit of water or milk if the gravy becomes too thick.
You may want to check out the following:
Mughlai Egg Curry

Sending this recipe for the following event:


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Monday, 14 November 2016

598. Paneer and Mushroom Enchiladas

DRASTIC CHANGES - America counts votes as India counts notes

   Early this morning as I sat at the computer to write my post for today I was in a dilemma whether to write about Children's Day which is being celebrated today in India or about the shock that the PM Narendra Modi gave the whole nation on Tuesday 8th November 2016 at around 9p.m. My blog being also a sort of diary for me about important events and personal happenings, the issue on demonetisation won.
  As usual I was busy watching my Indian series when I noticed on my mobile that our apartment block group going a bit crazy. Checked the first message and read that from midnight all 500 and 1000 rupees notes will be banned. My first reaction was 'is someone sending out a joke or what?' Then a few seconds later hubby dear calls from Mombasa to ask what's happening. That's when I knew that it was not a joke. I asked him to put the phone down and immediately switched to the news channel. I sat there wide eyed as Modiji made the announcement. Wide eyed not because I'm sitting on any unexplained source of money but because of the million thoughts per second going on in my head. I just exchanged all the dollars for rupees which is all in 1000s. I only have 400/- legal tender in my purse. How are we going to pay for all the wedding preparations. This was obviously my initial state of shock. I Facetimed hubby and he patiently heard all the ranting and raving. Finally, after that, the mind started working as to what has to be done once the banks open. 
   6 days later, I still am short of cash as the ATMs are not functioning and the ones that are, are quickly run out of cash. The queues at the banks are very very long. My daughter and I stood in the queue for nearly an hour to get Rs. 4000 each exchanged on the first day. As many taxis are still not on the Paytm system, we had no choice but to pay cash. The vegetable vendors comes everyday to our apartment and they are not as busy as they use to be  before as many residents do not have cash to pay for the fruits and vegetables. I feel bad for them. I had to go and shop for my veggies at a supermarket as they accept payment by card.  I have stopped giving clothes for ironing as I don't have cash to give to the man who irons. I didn't buy my favourite cup of filter coffee as I wanted to save on my short supply of cash.
   My maid was worried what will happen to her money. I advised her to get some exchanged for cash and deposit the rest in an account. Her biggest worries that she doesn't have an account. If she puts it in her son's account, will he give it back to her? So, I had to advise her that she should open an account in her name. I gave her some time off so she could get all this sorted out. We will have to go out later and check how the bank situations are and try and draw some cash. All these changes are for the positive, no doubt. Till then we all have to tide over all these minor difficulties and hopefully things will be on track as soon as possible.
  But till that happens lets talk about enchiladas. You may wonder why I've jumped to a totally unrelated topic; well, that's what our 66th theme was for #FoodieMonday#Bloghop. I nearly didn't do the challenge as I was wondering how I'm going to get my veggies. I stood in my dhobi area and looked down at all the fresh produce displayed out by the vendor and thought... 'so near and yet so far'. Then, I saw a Big Basket van and immediately registered on it and got my fresh supply. Yes, I felt really guilty that I was not able to support the vendor who is sitting in the sun trying to sell the fresh produce.
  I decided to stuff my enchiladas with paneer, mushrooms and spinach and I made a Ranchero sauce and homemade taco seasoning. Usually ranchero sauce is used to top breakfast enchiladas but I love the taste of it so decided to use it on my paneer mushroom enchiladas. So here's the recipe, all home made right from the tortilla to the seasoning.


 














PANEER AND MUSHROOM ENCHILADAS
Makes 8

For the corn tortillas:
¾ cup fine yellow corn flour
¾ cup plain flour (all purpose flour)
¼ tsp salt
½ -¾ cup warm water
½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp cumin powder

For the ranchero sauce:
2 tbsp olive oil
½ cup chopped green pepper (can add a mixture of green and coloured pepper)
1 cup chopped onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1-2 finely chopped jalapeños
1 large tomato chopped
1 cup fresh tomato puree
¼ cup chopped fresh coriander/cilantro
½ -¾ tsp salt
1-2 tsp seasoning

For the taco seasoning:
1 tbsp red chilli powder (I mixed normal and Kashmiri chilli powder)
¼ tsp garlic powder
¼ tsp onion powder
¼ tsp red chilli flakes
½ tsp dried oregano
½ tsp paprika
½ tsp pepper powder
1 tsp cumin powder

For the filling:
1 cup (approx 100g) chopped spinach
1 cup (approx 100g) chopped mushrooms
1 cup diced paneer
½ cup chopped fresh spring onion
1 tsp minced garlic
½ cup sweet corn
½ tsp salt
1-2 tsp seasoning
1 tbsp olive oil

For serving :
1 cup shredded cheese, either mozzarella or cheddar (more if you like more cheese)
1 cup sour cream (optional)
½ cup chopped fresh spring onion

extra flour for dusting

Preparation of the seasoning:

Mix all the ingredients and keep it the side till required.

Preparation of the tortillas:

  1. Sift the flours, salt, cumin powder and baking powder into a big bowl.
  2. Add little by little the warm water and form a soft dough. It should not stick to your fingers and it shouldn't be hard. Depending on the maize flour, you may require water that is anywhere between half a cup to three quarter.
  3. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and let it rest for 30 minutes.
  4. Divide the dough into 8 parts.
  5. Roll each part into a ball and cover with the damp cloth.
  6. Heat a frying pan or tawa over medium heat.
  7. Take one ball, coat it flour and roll it into a circle of nearly 7" diameter. If it sticks, dust more flour.
  8. Cook the tortilla on till bubbles appear. Flip it over and cook till you so see tiny brown specks.
  9. Place it on a cloth and cover it with the cloth.
  10. Repeat steps 5-9 with the remaining dough.
Preparation of the sauce:
  1. Heat oil in a saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Add the onions and chopped pepper and stir fry till they become a bit soft.
  3. Add the garlic and stir fry for a few seconds.
  4. Add the chopped tomato and tomato puree.
  5. Cover the pan and let the sauce simmer till it becomes thick.
  6. Take the pan off the heat and add salt, seasoning, jalapeño and chopped coriander.
  7. Mix well.
Preparation of the filling:
  1. Heat oil in a wide pan over medium heat.
  2. Add paneer and stir fry till its light brown.
  3. Remove the paneer from the pan using a slotted spoon.
  4. Add garlic and saute for a few seconds.
  5. Add mushrooms and stir fry till they become a little soft.
  6. Add the spinach and cook till it just wilts.
  7. Take the pan off the heat. Let the mixture cool down a bit.
  8. Add salt,seasoning, paneer and the chopped spring onion.
Final preparation:
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  2. Take a baking dish and smear some sauce over the bottom.
  3. Take a tortilla and put some filling in the middle. Cover it with the two end flaps.
  4. Place it in the baking tray with the seam side down.
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 with the remaining tortilla and filling.
  6. Cover the filled tortillas with sauce.
  7. Sprinkle grated cheese over it.
  8. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or till the cheese melts.
  9. Serve enchiladas topped with sour cream and chopped spring onion.
Tips:
  • The home made tortilla came out fine,not too soft or chewy. It did not become soggy on baking.
  • I prefer to make the sauce thick so that when the enchiladas are baked the water from the sauce does not make it soggy.
  • I love serving enchiladas with chopped avocados but I didn't get any. 
  • I didn't get sour cream so I whipped a bit of fresh cream with lemon.
  • Use a filling of your choice and make a sauce of your choice.
You may want to check out the following:
veg tacos
Sending this recipe for the following event:

Blog Hop














Tuesday, 8 November 2016

597.Colocasia Root(Taro root) Flatbread /Arbi ke Paranthe#BreadBakers

Colocasia Root(Taro root) Flatbread/Arbi ke Paranthe#BreadBakers

  When Karen Kerr of Karen's Kitchen Stories set the November theme to use any root vegetable in our bake I thought "oh no just baked with potatoes last month!" What now?? Thought of carrots and couldn't think beyond that. Thrice a week a vendor comes to our apartment complex to sell fruits and vegetables. He brings colocasia roots every time and I just tend to pass by them and pick up other vegetables. So this week, I actually stopped to buy the colocasia roots as now my mind had progressed from carrots to something different. By the way, if you want to learn how to use sourdough and make exotic and different kinds of breads then make sure you visit Karen's site. She has an awesome collection.
  Colocasia roots, also known as taro roots, or as arbi in India, is a popular vegetable in many parts the world. Its known as arrowroot or nduma in Kenya, kalo in Hawai, or as dasheen. I personally have never made anything using these roots but have eaten curries made from them. So why not use it to make flatbread I thought. I use the taro leaves to prepare a popular Gujarati snack called patra. Colcasia roots are tap roots and known as corm. They are edible roots rich in starch, low in fat and gluten protein. Its a rich source of Vitamin B and minerals like potassium, iron, magnesium, copper and manganese. These roots cannot be consumed raw as they contain oxalic acid which is destroyed when the roots are cooked. The roots can be boiled, baked, steamed or fried. However make sure to oil your hands when handling raw roots as it can cause itchiness. I boiled the roots first to avoid this problem.
   In India the roots or corms are used to make dry vegetable preparations, curries, cutlets, fritters, flatbreads. The options are endless. I decided to add boiled and mashed taro roots to the dough to make flatbread.
   All households in the Indian Sub Continent make flatbreads whether roasted, baked, shallow fried of some sort everyday. Its an important part of any meal right from breakfast to dinner. There are so many varieties of flatbreads in India itself, some made plain, some lightly spiced, some stuffed and some with vegetables, fruits, dried fruits or nuts added to the dough.
  So here's my preparation using a root vegetable (main is taro root and a little bit of ginger), a delicious spicy flatbread ideal breakfast treat with a cup of masala tea, some yogurt and pickle.












COLOCASIA ROOT(TARO ROOT) FLATBREAD/ARBI KE PARANTHE
Makes 6

5-6 colocasia roots(taro roots) or 1 cup boiled, peeled and mashed colocasia roots
1 cup wholewheat flour
½ cup chickpea flour (chana or besan flour)
½ -¾ tsp salt
¼ tsp ajwain (carom seeds)
¼ tsp asafoetida (hing) -optional
1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
¼ cup water
1-2 green chillis, chopped finely or crushed
1 tsp grated fresh ginger
2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander

oil for shallow frying

6 tsp clarified ghee or melted butter
extra flour for dusting


  1. Mix both flours, salt, asafoetida,carom seeds and cumin seeds in a big bowl.
  2. Add chopped coriander, chillis and ginger and mix well.
  3. Add the mashed taro or colcasia roots to the flour mixture.
  4. Mix everything together. The flour will be a bit wet.
  5. Add water and form a dough that is not too soft or hard.
  6. Lightly rub some oil on your palms and knead the dough till it becomes smooth.
  7. Cover and leave on the side for 15 minutes.
  8. Divide the dough into 6 parts. If it is very sticky, dust it with some flour.
  9. Roll each part into a ball.
  10. Heat a frying pan or tawa over medium low heat.
  11. Dust one ball with flour and roll it into a 6" diameter circle.
  12. Smear some melted butter or ghee over it.
  13. Fold into half. 
  14. Smear melted butter or ghee over the half.
  15. Fold into a quarter.
  16. Dust with little flour and roll the quarter into a triangle shape about 6" from one point to the other.
  17. Place the rolled triangle on the hot frying pan or tawa.
  18. Cook till small bubbles appear on the surface.
  19. Flip and cook the other side for 1 minute.
  20. Smear some oil over the paratha or flatbread and flip it over.
  21. Cook till brown specks appear on it.
  22. Smear oil on the top part of the paratha or flatbread and flip over. 
  23. Cook till brown specks appear and its a bit crispy. So basically both sides should have brown specks on them.
  24. Serve immediately with pickle, yogurt and hot cup of masala tea or coffee.
  25. Repeat steps 11 to 23 with the remaining dough.
Tips:
  • The steps may be many but making flatbread is actually pretty easy. Its like making french toast or pancakes which you cook on both sides on a frying pan.
  • Most of the ingredients are readily available in most Indian stores and in the bigger cities they are available in the supermarkets.
  • Replace the taro roots with potatoes, sweet potatoes, beetroots, carrots to make different sort of flatbreads.
  • Adjust the amount of green chillis according to your taste.
  • Boiled and mashed taro roots will appear sticky but once its added to the flour it will not be so sticky.
  • If the dough becomes too soft, add a bit more wholewheat flour.
You may want to check out what fellow bakers have baked using root vegetables: 
BreadBakers


#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.



We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.



If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com.

Monday, 7 November 2016

596. Moroccan Vegetable Soup

Back to a normal diet

  After all the festivities... Navratri followed by Diwali, its time to avoid all the sweet stuff, the fired goodies and its time to get back to a normal, healthy diet. After the festivities and over indulgence ( I must admit I had quite a bit of chips with yogurt dip and fried wedges) our #FoodieMonday#Bloghop team decided that our #65theme should be #soups. I love soups, not so much the ready made ones but  the home made ones. 
  Soups can be smooth and creamy, light and a bit watery or wholesome. I decided to prepare a wholesome soup, full of vegetables and lentils and with a hint of spiciness. You can literally make wholesome soups your meal. Just add the veggies, proteins and serve with some bread and hey presto you have a balanced meal.
  Moroccan soups are usually made with meat and veggies. They are served during the month of Ramadan to break the fast and during the rest of the year served as a starter or as a light meal. Basic Moroccan or Harira soup may have a bit of flour, lentils, chickpeas, onions, rice, eggs, herbs, spices, meat and olive oil. The variations from these basic ingredients are numberless. 
  I put together whatever vegetables I had and added lentils and chickpeas to make a healthy, tasty and filling soup. Go on use your imagination and make your own Moroccan (Harira) soup or just follow the recipe below.



 




 


MOROCCAN VEGETABLE SOUP
Serves 4 or 2 as a meal

1 tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion diced
1 tsp minced garlic
1 medium carrot, peeled and cut into round slices
½ cup lentils (puy)
½ cup cooked white chickpeas
1 small coloured sweet pepper, diced
1 tomato finely chopped
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1 cup fresh tomato puree*
1 tsp salt
2-3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander or parsley
4 cups water or stock
1-2 tbsp lemon juice
2 tbsp extra olive oil to drizzle on top (optional)

Spice blend:
1 tsp coriander powder
1 tsp cumin powder
1 tsp paprika powder
½ tsp ginger powder
½ tsp ground pepper
½ tsp cinnamon powder
¼ tsp turmeric powder
¼ tsp red chilli powder



  1. First of all mix the spices and keep it on the side till required.
  2. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat.
  3. Add onion and stir fry for a minute or so.
  4. Add garlic, sweet pepper, carrot, mushrooms and lentils.
  5. Stir fry for a minute.
  6. Lower the heat and cover the pan.
  7. Let the vegetables cook for 2-3 minutes.
  8. Add water or stock. Cover the pan and let the mixture cook till the lentils are done. This takes about 10-15 minutes.
  9. Add salt, chickpeas, chopped tomato, tomato puree and the spice blend.
  10. Mix well and let the soup simmer over low heat for 2-3 minutes.
  11. Add lemon juice and mix well.
  12. Garnish with chopped coriander, drizzle some olive oil over it and serve.
Tips:
  • *to make fresh tomato puree, cut 4-6 tomatoes into chunks and put them in a saucepan. Add 2 tbsp water. Cover the pan and cook the tomatoes over low heat till soft. Puree the cooked tomatoes in a blender.
  • Adjust the spices according to your taste.
  • You can add zucchini, french beans, leek, etc to the soup.
You may want to check out the following:
tomato carrot soup
momo soup
roasted pumpkin and salsa soup
Sending this recipe for the following event:





Blog Hop

Monday, 31 October 2016

595. Apple Squares

Nutan Varsh Abhinandan ( Happy New Year)
    Today it's New Year for the Gujarati community. Its also Govardhan Puja day. Back in Mombasa its the day when we dress up in new clothes and go temple hopping... yes you read right not bar hopping but temple hopping. We visit all the Hindu temples in Mombasa, meet friends, relatives and acquaintances. After that it's lunch at Ajay's foi's house. It usually is very hot around that time of the year so after a heavy lunch we need to take a nap. In the evenings we get ready and go to Patel Samaj to meet and greet our community people. Its also the day when I prepare some prasadam for the ISKCON temple in Mombasa. Its the only day when outsiders can prepare whatever they like for Govardhan Puja.
  But today New Year in Bangalore is quite different. Not attending any Govardhan Puja and may later go to a temple nearby. However, have spent the morning cooking as Nami's friends are coming over for dinner. It probably will be her last Diwali celebrations with friends in Bangalore. She's celebrated Diwali with them since she started college. Diwali next year will be quite different for her in Dubai. 
   My post is not about New Year but about #Fall. Our #FoodieMonday#Bloghop group decided to prepare #Fallrecipes as our 64th theme. I've had the opportunity to prepare quite a few fall breads and other recipes. This time round I decided to use apple for my fall recipe. I baked apple squares so that I could participate in this week's theme (missed the last 2 as I was not well) and also to give it to Nami's friend as a Diwali present. 
   Yesterday her friend invited us to her home for Diwali dinner. She made dal, rice and methi aloo for me(the only vegetarian:)). Each spoonful I ate was making me feel so emotional. I've known her friends for the past 12 years. They use to come home for Diwali and I would prepare dinner for them. Now they prepare dinner for me. Nami too is turning out into a fine cook and has her own style of cooking. My son Neel prepares food for us and I just cannot get over the fact that all my kids, their friends have all grown up into fine adults. 
   Today's recipe is a simple to bake and tasty apple squares. Once you have the ingredients at hand it's easy to put this recipe together. Fall means apples and cinnamon besides pumpkin, pears, berries and so many other veggies. One really cannot go wrong with the apple and cinnamon combination. So here's the recipe, enjoy it with a cup of tea, coffee or even with a dollop of vanilla ice cream for dessert.








APPLE SQUARES
16-20 squares(depending on how you cut them)

1 cup all purpose flour (plain flour)
1 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp salt
½ tsp cinnamon powder
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup peeled, cored and diced apple
¼(approx 50g) cup butter
½ cup white sugar
½ cup brown sugar
1 large egg
½ cup chopped walnuts
2 tbsp water

Topping:
2 tbsp white sugar
1-2 tsp cinnamon powder


  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  2. Line a 8"X8" square tin with parchment paper or grease it with butter and dust it with flour.
  3. To prepare the topping, mix the sugar and cinnamon powder.
  4. Sift flour, salt, baking powder and cinnamon powder together in a bowl.
  5. In another bowl add sugars both brown and white. Melt butter and add to it.
  6. Mix the butter and sugar well. Add vanilla extract, water and egg and whip it.
  7. Add the flour mixture and mix till the flour is wet.
  8. Add the chopped apple and walnuts. Incorporate it into the batter.
  9. Spoon the batter into the prepared tin. Level it out gently with the spoon.
  10. Sprinkle the topping over the batter evenly.
  11. Bake for 25-30 minutes. A toothpick inserted in the middle should come out clean.
  12. Let the bake cool down completely in the tin.
  13. Cut into squares and serve.
Tip:
  • Add cinnamon powder in the topping according to your taste, either 1 or 2 tsp.
  • I used a medium red apple for this bake.
  • Add nuts of your choice.
You may want to check out the following:
spiced pumpkin rolls

Sending this recipe for the following event:

Blog Hop

Monday, 21 November 2016

599. Shahi Mushroom Korma

A rich cuisine

       Every week my blogging scene is a bit like the following - try and prepare and write out the post before or on Monday. I wait impatiently to see what the rest of the #FoodieMonday #Bloghop members have made pertaining to the chosen theme, then I visit the posts and comment on them. Tuesday the group whatsapp goes all haywire as we try and decide on the theme. So basically we get 5 days to prepare the dish. But 5 days just fly and by Sunday I'm thinking "oh dear my dish is not ready". Then its like a storm in the kitchen. Well that's the scene nowadays till my daughter gets married. When I'm in Mombasa I usually have the dish ready before Saturday as usually hubby and I go to our beach apartment to spend the weekend. 
      Coming to our #67th theme for the #FoodieMonday#Bloghop, we decided to explore the #Mughlai cuisine. We all make something or the other with rich gravy or exotic biryanis, succulent kebabs without giving it much thought. However, when we decided on Mughlai cuisine, that's the time I actually had to research what is really means. 
       Mughlai cuisine is basically food prepared with a variety of aromatic spices varying from slightly mild to spicy. This cuisine was introduced to India by the Mughal Empire. It is believed that when they came to India, they were not happy with the food prepared locally and they introduced a lot of spices, nuts, fruits and cooking methods. Mughals being Muslims, most of the dishes were meat based and some vegetables were added to enhance the preparation. Most of the dishes are either of Turkic or Persian origins. 
      Muglai food basically consists of main dishes accompanied by side dishes. Biryanis, kebabs, kormas (qorma), koftas, naans are a part of the Mughlai cuisine. Compared to other cuisines of India, Mughlai gravy dishes are rich in spices, nuts, dairy products and thick and creamy. Vegetables and paneer were introduced into the Mughlai cuisine to suit the vegetarian palate. That does not mean that the Mughals didn't have a palate for sweets or desserts. Most famous Mughlai dessert or sweet preparations are Shahi Tukra, Sheer Korma, Falooda, Kalakand, Anjeer halwa to name a few.
    I decided to make Shahi Mushroom Korma for this theme. So what is korma(kurvama, qorma,kurma, khorma)? Basically the meat is braised(cooked at hight heat dry or with liquid) and then added to the gravy and cooked over low heat. A mixture of spices are added to the korma along with yogurt and cream. Once the dairy product is added, the cooking temperature is controlled so that the cream or yogurt does not curdle. Shahi means royal and the dish has cream and nuts and sometimes fruits too. Being a vegetarian I decided to make the korma using mushrooms.







SHAHI MUSHROOM KORMA
Serves 2

200g mushrooms
1 large onion
1 tsp garlic paste
1 tsp ginger paste
1 tsp green chilli paste
½ cup beaten yogurt
½ cup fresh cream or coconut cream
½ cup water
¼ cup cashew nuts
¼ cup almonds
1 tbsp poppy seeds (khus khus)
1 tbsp char magaz seeds (melon seeds)
2 tbsp hot milk
a few strands of saffron
¼ tsp turmeric powder (haldi)
1 tbsp kasuri methi
3 tbsp ghee (clarified butter)
¾-1 tsp salt

For the korma spice:
1 one inch cinnamon stick
3-4 cloves
2 green cardamom (elachi)
1 strand mace (javantri)
1 bay leaf
1 black cardamom (bada elachi)
½ tsp fennel seeds (valiyari)
½ tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
1 tsp coriander seeds
6 pepper corns

For garnishing:
4-6 cashew nuts
4-6 almonds
4-6 pistachios
6-8 raisins

Preparation of the korma spice mixture:

  1. Dry roast the spices in a wide pan over low heat till the cumin begins to crackle. Make sure you stir the spices constantly.
  2. Take the pan off the heat. Spread the roasted spices in a plate to cool.
  3. Grind the spices in coffee grinder or dry grinder.
  4. Keep the korma spice on the side till required.
Preparation of the korma:
  1. Soak the saffron in hot milk.
  2. Wash and wipe the mushrooms. Cut them into halves or quarters depending on the size.
  3. Peel and cut the onion into chunks. Grind it to a paste.
  4. Roast  the cashew nuts, almonds, poppy seeds and melon seeds in a pan over low heat till the poppy seeds begin to pop. Stir the mixture constantly. Let the mixture cool down a bit and then grind it into a powder.
  5. Heat 1 tbsp ghee in a pan over low heat. Add the cashew nuts, almonds, pistachios and raisins. Fry for a few seconds. Remove the nuts and raisins and keep on the side.
  6. Add 1 tbsp ghee to the pan and stir fry the mushrooms over hight heat for 2-3 minutes. Stir the mushrooms frequently.
  7. Remove the mushrooms from the pan and keep it on the side till required.
  8. Add the remaining ghee to the pan.
  9. Add the onion paste and cook till it becomes light pink.
  10. Add garlic, ginger and chilli paste and stir fry for a few seconds.
  11. Add the nut powder. Mix well. Add water and mix till the mixture appears creamy.
  12. Add 1 tsp of the korma spice, turmeric powder, soaked saffron along with the milk and yogurt. Mix well.
  13. Add the mushrooms and salt. Mix well. Cover the pan and let the mushrooms simmer in the sauce over low heat for 10 minutes.
  14. Add kasuri methi and cream and mix well. cook it for 2-3 minutes.
  15. Put the shahi mushroom korma in a serving bowl.
  16. Garnish with the fried nuts and raisins and serve with naans, rice, rotis or parathas.
Tips:
  • Add the korma spice according to your taste.
  • Add vegetables or paneer along with mushrooms if you like.
  • Can add either cream or coconut cream to the korma.
  • Add a bit of water or milk if the gravy becomes too thick.
You may want to check out the following:
Mughlai Egg Curry

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Monday, 14 November 2016

598. Paneer and Mushroom Enchiladas

DRASTIC CHANGES - America counts votes as India counts notes

   Early this morning as I sat at the computer to write my post for today I was in a dilemma whether to write about Children's Day which is being celebrated today in India or about the shock that the PM Narendra Modi gave the whole nation on Tuesday 8th November 2016 at around 9p.m. My blog being also a sort of diary for me about important events and personal happenings, the issue on demonetisation won.
  As usual I was busy watching my Indian series when I noticed on my mobile that our apartment block group going a bit crazy. Checked the first message and read that from midnight all 500 and 1000 rupees notes will be banned. My first reaction was 'is someone sending out a joke or what?' Then a few seconds later hubby dear calls from Mombasa to ask what's happening. That's when I knew that it was not a joke. I asked him to put the phone down and immediately switched to the news channel. I sat there wide eyed as Modiji made the announcement. Wide eyed not because I'm sitting on any unexplained source of money but because of the million thoughts per second going on in my head. I just exchanged all the dollars for rupees which is all in 1000s. I only have 400/- legal tender in my purse. How are we going to pay for all the wedding preparations. This was obviously my initial state of shock. I Facetimed hubby and he patiently heard all the ranting and raving. Finally, after that, the mind started working as to what has to be done once the banks open. 
   6 days later, I still am short of cash as the ATMs are not functioning and the ones that are, are quickly run out of cash. The queues at the banks are very very long. My daughter and I stood in the queue for nearly an hour to get Rs. 4000 each exchanged on the first day. As many taxis are still not on the Paytm system, we had no choice but to pay cash. The vegetable vendors comes everyday to our apartment and they are not as busy as they use to be  before as many residents do not have cash to pay for the fruits and vegetables. I feel bad for them. I had to go and shop for my veggies at a supermarket as they accept payment by card.  I have stopped giving clothes for ironing as I don't have cash to give to the man who irons. I didn't buy my favourite cup of filter coffee as I wanted to save on my short supply of cash.
   My maid was worried what will happen to her money. I advised her to get some exchanged for cash and deposit the rest in an account. Her biggest worries that she doesn't have an account. If she puts it in her son's account, will he give it back to her? So, I had to advise her that she should open an account in her name. I gave her some time off so she could get all this sorted out. We will have to go out later and check how the bank situations are and try and draw some cash. All these changes are for the positive, no doubt. Till then we all have to tide over all these minor difficulties and hopefully things will be on track as soon as possible.
  But till that happens lets talk about enchiladas. You may wonder why I've jumped to a totally unrelated topic; well, that's what our 66th theme was for #FoodieMonday#Bloghop. I nearly didn't do the challenge as I was wondering how I'm going to get my veggies. I stood in my dhobi area and looked down at all the fresh produce displayed out by the vendor and thought... 'so near and yet so far'. Then, I saw a Big Basket van and immediately registered on it and got my fresh supply. Yes, I felt really guilty that I was not able to support the vendor who is sitting in the sun trying to sell the fresh produce.
  I decided to stuff my enchiladas with paneer, mushrooms and spinach and I made a Ranchero sauce and homemade taco seasoning. Usually ranchero sauce is used to top breakfast enchiladas but I love the taste of it so decided to use it on my paneer mushroom enchiladas. So here's the recipe, all home made right from the tortilla to the seasoning.


 














PANEER AND MUSHROOM ENCHILADAS
Makes 8

For the corn tortillas:
¾ cup fine yellow corn flour
¾ cup plain flour (all purpose flour)
¼ tsp salt
½ -¾ cup warm water
½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp cumin powder

For the ranchero sauce:
2 tbsp olive oil
½ cup chopped green pepper (can add a mixture of green and coloured pepper)
1 cup chopped onion
1 tbsp minced garlic
1-2 finely chopped jalapeños
1 large tomato chopped
1 cup fresh tomato puree
¼ cup chopped fresh coriander/cilantro
½ -¾ tsp salt
1-2 tsp seasoning

For the taco seasoning:
1 tbsp red chilli powder (I mixed normal and Kashmiri chilli powder)
¼ tsp garlic powder
¼ tsp onion powder
¼ tsp red chilli flakes
½ tsp dried oregano
½ tsp paprika
½ tsp pepper powder
1 tsp cumin powder

For the filling:
1 cup (approx 100g) chopped spinach
1 cup (approx 100g) chopped mushrooms
1 cup diced paneer
½ cup chopped fresh spring onion
1 tsp minced garlic
½ cup sweet corn
½ tsp salt
1-2 tsp seasoning
1 tbsp olive oil

For serving :
1 cup shredded cheese, either mozzarella or cheddar (more if you like more cheese)
1 cup sour cream (optional)
½ cup chopped fresh spring onion

extra flour for dusting

Preparation of the seasoning:

Mix all the ingredients and keep it the side till required.

Preparation of the tortillas:

  1. Sift the flours, salt, cumin powder and baking powder into a big bowl.
  2. Add little by little the warm water and form a soft dough. It should not stick to your fingers and it shouldn't be hard. Depending on the maize flour, you may require water that is anywhere between half a cup to three quarter.
  3. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and let it rest for 30 minutes.
  4. Divide the dough into 8 parts.
  5. Roll each part into a ball and cover with the damp cloth.
  6. Heat a frying pan or tawa over medium heat.
  7. Take one ball, coat it flour and roll it into a circle of nearly 7" diameter. If it sticks, dust more flour.
  8. Cook the tortilla on till bubbles appear. Flip it over and cook till you so see tiny brown specks.
  9. Place it on a cloth and cover it with the cloth.
  10. Repeat steps 5-9 with the remaining dough.
Preparation of the sauce:
  1. Heat oil in a saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Add the onions and chopped pepper and stir fry till they become a bit soft.
  3. Add the garlic and stir fry for a few seconds.
  4. Add the chopped tomato and tomato puree.
  5. Cover the pan and let the sauce simmer till it becomes thick.
  6. Take the pan off the heat and add salt, seasoning, jalapeño and chopped coriander.
  7. Mix well.
Preparation of the filling:
  1. Heat oil in a wide pan over medium heat.
  2. Add paneer and stir fry till its light brown.
  3. Remove the paneer from the pan using a slotted spoon.
  4. Add garlic and saute for a few seconds.
  5. Add mushrooms and stir fry till they become a little soft.
  6. Add the spinach and cook till it just wilts.
  7. Take the pan off the heat. Let the mixture cool down a bit.
  8. Add salt,seasoning, paneer and the chopped spring onion.
Final preparation:
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  2. Take a baking dish and smear some sauce over the bottom.
  3. Take a tortilla and put some filling in the middle. Cover it with the two end flaps.
  4. Place it in the baking tray with the seam side down.
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 with the remaining tortilla and filling.
  6. Cover the filled tortillas with sauce.
  7. Sprinkle grated cheese over it.
  8. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or till the cheese melts.
  9. Serve enchiladas topped with sour cream and chopped spring onion.
Tips:
  • The home made tortilla came out fine,not too soft or chewy. It did not become soggy on baking.
  • I prefer to make the sauce thick so that when the enchiladas are baked the water from the sauce does not make it soggy.
  • I love serving enchiladas with chopped avocados but I didn't get any. 
  • I didn't get sour cream so I whipped a bit of fresh cream with lemon.
  • Use a filling of your choice and make a sauce of your choice.
You may want to check out the following:
veg tacos
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Tuesday, 8 November 2016

597.Colocasia Root(Taro root) Flatbread /Arbi ke Paranthe#BreadBakers

Colocasia Root(Taro root) Flatbread/Arbi ke Paranthe#BreadBakers

  When Karen Kerr of Karen's Kitchen Stories set the November theme to use any root vegetable in our bake I thought "oh no just baked with potatoes last month!" What now?? Thought of carrots and couldn't think beyond that. Thrice a week a vendor comes to our apartment complex to sell fruits and vegetables. He brings colocasia roots every time and I just tend to pass by them and pick up other vegetables. So this week, I actually stopped to buy the colocasia roots as now my mind had progressed from carrots to something different. By the way, if you want to learn how to use sourdough and make exotic and different kinds of breads then make sure you visit Karen's site. She has an awesome collection.
  Colocasia roots, also known as taro roots, or as arbi in India, is a popular vegetable in many parts the world. Its known as arrowroot or nduma in Kenya, kalo in Hawai, or as dasheen. I personally have never made anything using these roots but have eaten curries made from them. So why not use it to make flatbread I thought. I use the taro leaves to prepare a popular Gujarati snack called patra. Colcasia roots are tap roots and known as corm. They are edible roots rich in starch, low in fat and gluten protein. Its a rich source of Vitamin B and minerals like potassium, iron, magnesium, copper and manganese. These roots cannot be consumed raw as they contain oxalic acid which is destroyed when the roots are cooked. The roots can be boiled, baked, steamed or fried. However make sure to oil your hands when handling raw roots as it can cause itchiness. I boiled the roots first to avoid this problem.
   In India the roots or corms are used to make dry vegetable preparations, curries, cutlets, fritters, flatbreads. The options are endless. I decided to add boiled and mashed taro roots to the dough to make flatbread.
   All households in the Indian Sub Continent make flatbreads whether roasted, baked, shallow fried of some sort everyday. Its an important part of any meal right from breakfast to dinner. There are so many varieties of flatbreads in India itself, some made plain, some lightly spiced, some stuffed and some with vegetables, fruits, dried fruits or nuts added to the dough.
  So here's my preparation using a root vegetable (main is taro root and a little bit of ginger), a delicious spicy flatbread ideal breakfast treat with a cup of masala tea, some yogurt and pickle.












COLOCASIA ROOT(TARO ROOT) FLATBREAD/ARBI KE PARANTHE
Makes 6

5-6 colocasia roots(taro roots) or 1 cup boiled, peeled and mashed colocasia roots
1 cup wholewheat flour
½ cup chickpea flour (chana or besan flour)
½ -¾ tsp salt
¼ tsp ajwain (carom seeds)
¼ tsp asafoetida (hing) -optional
1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
¼ cup water
1-2 green chillis, chopped finely or crushed
1 tsp grated fresh ginger
2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander

oil for shallow frying

6 tsp clarified ghee or melted butter
extra flour for dusting


  1. Mix both flours, salt, asafoetida,carom seeds and cumin seeds in a big bowl.
  2. Add chopped coriander, chillis and ginger and mix well.
  3. Add the mashed taro or colcasia roots to the flour mixture.
  4. Mix everything together. The flour will be a bit wet.
  5. Add water and form a dough that is not too soft or hard.
  6. Lightly rub some oil on your palms and knead the dough till it becomes smooth.
  7. Cover and leave on the side for 15 minutes.
  8. Divide the dough into 6 parts. If it is very sticky, dust it with some flour.
  9. Roll each part into a ball.
  10. Heat a frying pan or tawa over medium low heat.
  11. Dust one ball with flour and roll it into a 6" diameter circle.
  12. Smear some melted butter or ghee over it.
  13. Fold into half. 
  14. Smear melted butter or ghee over the half.
  15. Fold into a quarter.
  16. Dust with little flour and roll the quarter into a triangle shape about 6" from one point to the other.
  17. Place the rolled triangle on the hot frying pan or tawa.
  18. Cook till small bubbles appear on the surface.
  19. Flip and cook the other side for 1 minute.
  20. Smear some oil over the paratha or flatbread and flip it over.
  21. Cook till brown specks appear on it.
  22. Smear oil on the top part of the paratha or flatbread and flip over. 
  23. Cook till brown specks appear and its a bit crispy. So basically both sides should have brown specks on them.
  24. Serve immediately with pickle, yogurt and hot cup of masala tea or coffee.
  25. Repeat steps 11 to 23 with the remaining dough.
Tips:
  • The steps may be many but making flatbread is actually pretty easy. Its like making french toast or pancakes which you cook on both sides on a frying pan.
  • Most of the ingredients are readily available in most Indian stores and in the bigger cities they are available in the supermarkets.
  • Replace the taro roots with potatoes, sweet potatoes, beetroots, carrots to make different sort of flatbreads.
  • Adjust the amount of green chillis according to your taste.
  • Boiled and mashed taro roots will appear sticky but once its added to the flour it will not be so sticky.
  • If the dough becomes too soft, add a bit more wholewheat flour.
You may want to check out what fellow bakers have baked using root vegetables: 
BreadBakers


#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.



We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.



If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com.

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Monday, 7 November 2016

596. Moroccan Vegetable Soup

Back to a normal diet

  After all the festivities... Navratri followed by Diwali, its time to avoid all the sweet stuff, the fired goodies and its time to get back to a normal, healthy diet. After the festivities and over indulgence ( I must admit I had quite a bit of chips with yogurt dip and fried wedges) our #FoodieMonday#Bloghop team decided that our #65theme should be #soups. I love soups, not so much the ready made ones but  the home made ones. 
  Soups can be smooth and creamy, light and a bit watery or wholesome. I decided to prepare a wholesome soup, full of vegetables and lentils and with a hint of spiciness. You can literally make wholesome soups your meal. Just add the veggies, proteins and serve with some bread and hey presto you have a balanced meal.
  Moroccan soups are usually made with meat and veggies. They are served during the month of Ramadan to break the fast and during the rest of the year served as a starter or as a light meal. Basic Moroccan or Harira soup may have a bit of flour, lentils, chickpeas, onions, rice, eggs, herbs, spices, meat and olive oil. The variations from these basic ingredients are numberless. 
  I put together whatever vegetables I had and added lentils and chickpeas to make a healthy, tasty and filling soup. Go on use your imagination and make your own Moroccan (Harira) soup or just follow the recipe below.



 




 


MOROCCAN VEGETABLE SOUP
Serves 4 or 2 as a meal

1 tbsp olive oil
1 medium onion diced
1 tsp minced garlic
1 medium carrot, peeled and cut into round slices
½ cup lentils (puy)
½ cup cooked white chickpeas
1 small coloured sweet pepper, diced
1 tomato finely chopped
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1 cup fresh tomato puree*
1 tsp salt
2-3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander or parsley
4 cups water or stock
1-2 tbsp lemon juice
2 tbsp extra olive oil to drizzle on top (optional)

Spice blend:
1 tsp coriander powder
1 tsp cumin powder
1 tsp paprika powder
½ tsp ginger powder
½ tsp ground pepper
½ tsp cinnamon powder
¼ tsp turmeric powder
¼ tsp red chilli powder



  1. First of all mix the spices and keep it on the side till required.
  2. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat.
  3. Add onion and stir fry for a minute or so.
  4. Add garlic, sweet pepper, carrot, mushrooms and lentils.
  5. Stir fry for a minute.
  6. Lower the heat and cover the pan.
  7. Let the vegetables cook for 2-3 minutes.
  8. Add water or stock. Cover the pan and let the mixture cook till the lentils are done. This takes about 10-15 minutes.
  9. Add salt, chickpeas, chopped tomato, tomato puree and the spice blend.
  10. Mix well and let the soup simmer over low heat for 2-3 minutes.
  11. Add lemon juice and mix well.
  12. Garnish with chopped coriander, drizzle some olive oil over it and serve.
Tips:
  • *to make fresh tomato puree, cut 4-6 tomatoes into chunks and put them in a saucepan. Add 2 tbsp water. Cover the pan and cook the tomatoes over low heat till soft. Puree the cooked tomatoes in a blender.
  • Adjust the spices according to your taste.
  • You can add zucchini, french beans, leek, etc to the soup.
You may want to check out the following:
tomato carrot soup
momo soup
roasted pumpkin and salsa soup
Sending this recipe for the following event:





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Monday, 31 October 2016

595. Apple Squares

Nutan Varsh Abhinandan ( Happy New Year)
    Today it's New Year for the Gujarati community. Its also Govardhan Puja day. Back in Mombasa its the day when we dress up in new clothes and go temple hopping... yes you read right not bar hopping but temple hopping. We visit all the Hindu temples in Mombasa, meet friends, relatives and acquaintances. After that it's lunch at Ajay's foi's house. It usually is very hot around that time of the year so after a heavy lunch we need to take a nap. In the evenings we get ready and go to Patel Samaj to meet and greet our community people. Its also the day when I prepare some prasadam for the ISKCON temple in Mombasa. Its the only day when outsiders can prepare whatever they like for Govardhan Puja.
  But today New Year in Bangalore is quite different. Not attending any Govardhan Puja and may later go to a temple nearby. However, have spent the morning cooking as Nami's friends are coming over for dinner. It probably will be her last Diwali celebrations with friends in Bangalore. She's celebrated Diwali with them since she started college. Diwali next year will be quite different for her in Dubai. 
   My post is not about New Year but about #Fall. Our #FoodieMonday#Bloghop group decided to prepare #Fallrecipes as our 64th theme. I've had the opportunity to prepare quite a few fall breads and other recipes. This time round I decided to use apple for my fall recipe. I baked apple squares so that I could participate in this week's theme (missed the last 2 as I was not well) and also to give it to Nami's friend as a Diwali present. 
   Yesterday her friend invited us to her home for Diwali dinner. She made dal, rice and methi aloo for me(the only vegetarian:)). Each spoonful I ate was making me feel so emotional. I've known her friends for the past 12 years. They use to come home for Diwali and I would prepare dinner for them. Now they prepare dinner for me. Nami too is turning out into a fine cook and has her own style of cooking. My son Neel prepares food for us and I just cannot get over the fact that all my kids, their friends have all grown up into fine adults. 
   Today's recipe is a simple to bake and tasty apple squares. Once you have the ingredients at hand it's easy to put this recipe together. Fall means apples and cinnamon besides pumpkin, pears, berries and so many other veggies. One really cannot go wrong with the apple and cinnamon combination. So here's the recipe, enjoy it with a cup of tea, coffee or even with a dollop of vanilla ice cream for dessert.








APPLE SQUARES
16-20 squares(depending on how you cut them)

1 cup all purpose flour (plain flour)
1 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp salt
½ tsp cinnamon powder
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup peeled, cored and diced apple
¼(approx 50g) cup butter
½ cup white sugar
½ cup brown sugar
1 large egg
½ cup chopped walnuts
2 tbsp water

Topping:
2 tbsp white sugar
1-2 tsp cinnamon powder


  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  2. Line a 8"X8" square tin with parchment paper or grease it with butter and dust it with flour.
  3. To prepare the topping, mix the sugar and cinnamon powder.
  4. Sift flour, salt, baking powder and cinnamon powder together in a bowl.
  5. In another bowl add sugars both brown and white. Melt butter and add to it.
  6. Mix the butter and sugar well. Add vanilla extract, water and egg and whip it.
  7. Add the flour mixture and mix till the flour is wet.
  8. Add the chopped apple and walnuts. Incorporate it into the batter.
  9. Spoon the batter into the prepared tin. Level it out gently with the spoon.
  10. Sprinkle the topping over the batter evenly.
  11. Bake for 25-30 minutes. A toothpick inserted in the middle should come out clean.
  12. Let the bake cool down completely in the tin.
  13. Cut into squares and serve.
Tip:
  • Add cinnamon powder in the topping according to your taste, either 1 or 2 tsp.
  • I used a medium red apple for this bake.
  • Add nuts of your choice.
You may want to check out the following:
spiced pumpkin rolls

Sending this recipe for the following event:

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