Thursday, 27 April 2017

638. Methi and Spinach Potato Curry (Fenugreek and Spinach Potato Curry)

Guest No.9

       My guest this week is my sister in law Arti. She is my hubby's sister and the youngest.Yes we have two Arti's in the family... my brother's wife and my hubby's sister. When I got married, Arti was very thin.I thought that if somebody huffed and puffed and blew her away, she would probably fly away.  Her friends became my friends as I didn't know anyone in Mombasa(except for my aunt's family). At social gatherings she would make sure that I was not left alone. We didn't spend that many years together as after my marriage she went off to UK to complete her beautician course. She came back and that's when her training in the kitchen began under my mother in law. At breakfast time Nunu would explain to her how the dish she was supposed to cook is prepared. I too would have my ears open. 
      
      When I had my twins, she was a great help to me. My daughter Nami would cry in the evenings and the only person who could keep her quiet and calm was Arti. She had to keep rocking Nami for over an hour! Arti has always has been helpful and caring towards my children. They love spending time with her. 

      I will never forget the short holiday we spent together when she visited Montreal. Its probably the most time I've spent with her after she emigrated to US. We had a wonderful time with her. 

       My other memorable time with her is when she gave birth to her son. She had come down to Mombasa for her delivery. As my kids and her daughter were pretty young, Nunu decided to look after the kids at home while I went with her to the hospital when her labour pains began. I don't think I was scared when I gave birth to my kids but was really scared when she got exhausted and was finding it difficult to deliver her son. For me that was a nerve wrecking experience but by God's grace, all was well in the end.

       I have so much respect for her as she is a caring, loving and hard working person. Arti is a good cook and we all love her peas kofta curry and her farsi puri.

Over to Arti:
     When my brother first my bhabhi, he was over the moon, talking about her beautiful long hair which she cut off before the twins were born. Bhabhi had culinary skills from the time my brother got married to her. She would always surprise me by baking beautiful cakes on my birthdays. My children Veer and Pooja would always love to spend their holidays at mama and mami's house. Bhabhi has been very supportive when I made the biggest decision n my life of moving to US from Kenya. She helped me to clear the house, packing our goods and cooking meals.



METHI AND SPINACH POTATO CURRY

4 potatoes, peeled and cut into cubes
1 cup chopped fresh fenugreek (methi)
1 cup chopped spinach (palak)
3 tomatoes, blend into a puree
1 onion, chopped finely
1 tsp ginger paste
1 tsp green chilli paste
1 tsp garlic paste
1 tsp mustard seeds (rai)
1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
4-5 peppercorns
4-5 cloves
2 cinnamon sticks (about an inch long)
pinch of asafoetida (hing)
1 tsp cumin powder (jeera powder)
1 tsp coriander powder (dhania powder)
¼ tsp turmeric powder (haldi)
1 tsp red chilli powder
½ tsp sugar
1 tsp pav bhaji masala
½ - 1 cup fresh cream
2-3 tbsp oil
salt according to taste
fresh coriander for garnishing

  1. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat.
  2. Add mustard, cumin seeds, cloves, peppercorn, cinnamon.
  3. When the mustard seeds begin to crackle add a pinch of asafoetida.
  4. Add the chopped onions and garlic paste. Stir fry for a few minutes.
  5. Add methi, spinach and potatoes.
  6. Add salt, cumin, coriander, chilli and turmeric powders.
  7. Add ginger and green chilli paste. Mix well.
  8. Cover the pan and cook till the potatoes are done.
  9. Add tomato puree, sugar and pav bhaji masala.
  10. Let the tomato puree cook for 4-5 minutes.
  11. Add the fresh cream.You should get an orangish colour gravy.
  12. Garnish with fresh chopped coriander.Serve the curry with parathas or rice.
You may want to check out what the other guests had prepared:

Eggless Zucchini Bread Muffins
Baba Ganoush







Monday, 24 April 2017

637. Baked Turmeric Tostones

A Healthy Snack

   Its Monday and that means the #FoodieMonday #Bloghop group will have a theme decided on last week and the recipes are live on Mondays. For our #89th theme,our group decided on #raw bananas which was suggested by Kriti, food blogger at Krispy Kadhai.

   I'm not new to raw bananas, plantains or matoke as its called in East Africa. Matoke is a part of the staple diet for many Ugandans. They add it to stew, mash it, fry it, grill it in charcoal fire or boil it. Lets not confuse the normal sweet banana with the raw banana or plantain. Plantain is the cousin of the sweet banana. It has many nutritional values just like the sweet banana. However, you cannot consume plantains in the raw form. Many diet plans replace plantains to make tortillas, cakes, cookies, mash, pizza base etc.The charming thing about plantains is that they are available throughout the year.The reason plantains is a part of the staple diet for many African countries is because its high in carbohydrates, therefore provides the much needed energy, keeps on fuller for longer periods of time. Plantains are rich in potassium and fiber,rich in Vitamin C. 
 There are 3 type of raw bananas, plantains or matoke. 

  • The pulp of the green ones is fairly hard and are starchy and not sweet. Usually one needs to peel them using a knife. The green ones are best for making  plantain chips.
  • The yellow plantains are slightly sweet and mature.These plantains are usually fried,boiled, grilled and used in stews or to prepare mash.
  • Black plantains in spite of the colour are still good to eat.At this stage they are the sweetest and softest.These are usually used for baking and desserts.
   I've grown up eating plantain chips or crisps as we call them in this part of the world. They are my favourite. So when I came across an unusual recipe (well, for me!) where the green plantain is baked but tastes similar to plantain chips, I decided to try out the recipe. 
   Tostones (pronounced as tos-toe-nays) are a popular snack dish in many Caribbean and Latin American parts of the world. The ones sold as street food are fried. Chunks of plantains are fried till just cooked. Then they are smashed and fried again. I was so tempted to fry them but then I remembered that this month I'm trying to keep away from fried goodies (difficult I must say!). So the hunt began for the baked ones. The baked ones tasted delicious but I would advise that have them as soon as they are ready. A few were left and they lost their crunchiness. I will try the fried ones at some point but till then the healthy version will have to do.
  
   Tostones are usually served with a garlic sauce called Mojo (pronounced as Mo-ho). I prepared the sauce but didn't like it. However, I will add the recipe for you to try. Next time my tostones will be served with mayonnaise sauce, chilli sauce,guacamole, salsa or the good old Indian green chutney :)








BAKED TOSTONES
Serves 4
Recipe source: Skinny Taste

3 green plantains
2 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp turmeric powder (haldi)

For Mojo sauce:
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
½ tsp oregano (dried)
¼ cup orange juice
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp coarse pepper powder
¼ tsp salt

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Line a baking tray with parchment paper. If like me you've run out of parchment paper, then grease the tray lightly with oil.
  2. Mix 1 tbsp oil, salt and turmeric powder in a big bowl.
  3. First you need to peel the plantains. Cut a slit through the skin lengthwise. Using your fingers, peel away the skin.
  4. Cut the plantains into ½ " chunks and put it in the bowl with the oil mixture.
  5. Mix well till all the pieces are coated with oil.
  6. Arrange the plantain pieces in the tray with the cut side facing up.
  7. Bake for 10-15 minutes till they are slightly brown. Don't overcook them.
  8. Remove the tray from the oven.
  9. If you don't have a tostonera (a press) then you can use a glass or a small bowl.
  10. Press each piece down. I would recommend that you do that on a chopping board or a plate and not on the hot tray as the tostones may get stuck.
  11. Lightly oil the tray again.
  12. Arrange the smashed plantain pieces on the baking tray.
  13. Brush them lightly with olive oil.
  14. Bake again for 15 minutes till they are light golden brown. Make sure half way you flip the tostones.
  15. To prepare the mojo sauce, mix all the ingredients.
  16. Serve immediately.
Tips:
  • Can make this during the fasting or Ekadashi time, but don't serve it with the garlic sauce. A yogurt dip would go well with it.
  • If during fasting you don't use turmeric powder, then omit it.
  • To get a nice smashed piece make sure you don't slice the bananas too thin.
  • For  more crispy tostones bake further for 5 minutes.
You may want to check out other plantain recipes:

raw banana paneer pattis
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Tuesday, 18 April 2017

Salads 2

Healthy and filling Salads

Salads don't have to be boring. You can make a wholesome and filling meal by adding your choice of vegetables, fruits, nuts, rice, pasta, quinoa, bulgur wheat or whatever you like. The final combination should look colourful and appetizing. 

Here are a few salads you can make as a light meal for dinner or even as packed lunch. Just pack the dressing separately in a little jar or bottle.



Click on the salad names for the recipe

In order from top left to right :

Sweet Potato and Pasta Salad

Peanut and Fruit Salad

Rice Salad

Mango and Curried Chickpea Salad

In order from bottom left to right:

Moroccan Couscous Salad

Burrito Bowl Salad

Cucumber and Orange Salad

Mango Avocado Salad

Monday, 17 April 2017

636. Watermelon Bruschetta

Antipasti

         Italian meals are usually served with a starter. Starters or antipasti (singular antipasto) usually consist of cured meat, pickled vegetables, mushrooms, cheeses, olives, peperocini, pickled meats etc. These are suppose to be colourful, attractive and usually should be able to change the mood of  people or gathering who will dine together. Anti means before and pastus means meal. Therefore its the starter or appetizer. Antipasti is usually served in individual plates or as bite size where diners pick it and enjoy it. It can be cold or warm or hot.
         
       There is much confusion between the crostini and the bruschetta. Crostini are usually made from small bread slices like an Italian baguette.The bread is toasted and the topping are more rich. 
       
       Bruschetta is usually served on more rustic Italian bread slices that are slightly bigger. The bread slices are usually roasted over coal. The word bruschetta comes from the Italian word bruscare...which means to roast over coal. The slices are usually rubbed with garlic and drizzled with olive oil. Originally it was served with olive oil drizzled on it. Nowadays a variety of topping are used to make bruschetta.
        
        Nowadays there's not much difference between the two especially when you're not able to roast a bread over coal. Bruschetta are prepared with whichever bread is available. I baked an Italian baguette at home a day before I wanted to make the crostini. After just 20 minutes of  second fermentation, the shaped bread looked a bit fatter and no way was I going to get nice dainty slices. 
        
       As the other ingredients were ready and wine already chilled, I decided to deviate from the norm and made Watermelon Bruschetta. #FoodieMonday #Bloghop group decided that  #watermelon will be our 88th theme. My contribution for this theme is the delicious and refreshing Watermelon Bruschetta.







WATERMELON BRUSCHETTA
Makes 8-10 pieces

8-10 slices of bread preferably a baguette or any other rustic bread
4-5 cloves of garlic
4-6 tbsp olive oil
1½ cups watermelon chopped into small cubes
1 cup crumbled feta cheese
½ cup thick plain yogurt
½ cup coarse pepper powder
8-10 black olives, sliced
2 tbsp balsamic syrup
2-3 tbsp chopped spring onion
10-12 mint leaves chopped


  1. Mix crumbled feta and yogurt together to get a smooth paste.Add pepper powder and mix well.
  2. Smear olive oil over the slices on both sides.
  3. Toast them lightly in a pan over medium heat.
  4. Rub garlic over the toasted slices.
  5. Spread some feta cheese mixture over the slices.
  6. Top the slices with watermelon, olives, spring onion and mint.
  7. Drizzle some balsamic syrup over the topping and serve.
Tips:
  • I did not add any salt as both the feta and bottled olives are salty.
  • You can toast the slices over a BBQ grill.
  • Use ricotta cheese instead of Feta if your prefer.
You may want to check out other starter recipes:
mashed avocado and tomato bruschetta


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Friday, 14 April 2017

635.Baba Ganoush

GUEST NO.8 ON THE BLOG

    My 8th Guest on the blog is Mehwaesh Islam. Now you may be wondering how did an Islam enter the Patel family. Let me clear up the air for you. Mehwaesh is originally from Bangladesh, married to my best friend Daxa's son. Daxa and family are more like family than friends to me.Paras, her son is like my son. So technically that makes Mehwaesh my daughter in law. I first met Mehwaesh during their wedding in Bangladesh. At first sight she appeared to me as a very sophisticated lady. On getting to know her, she is a very intelligent, caring, quiet and a friendly person. I had the opportunity to lunch with them at their quaint little home in London. From her little little kitchen she was able to put out quite a fare from chaat as a starter to egg biryani and sabji followed by dessert. What I loved about her cooking was that little Bangladeshi touch and flavour to most of her dishes. As I follow them on social media both husband and wife team practically every weekend introduce me to new cuisine, new street food, new open air markets and exciting places to visit. Both are foodies and I'm sure that when I next visit them, there will be new dishes for me to sample.

    Mehwaesh works in science policy. Give her a book and she's the happiest girl on earth. Her other hobbies are watching Turkish dramas, knitting, cooking and travelling. 

Over to Mehwaesh:
     Huge thanks to Mayuri Aunty for inviting me to post a recipe on her blog.I have know Mayuri Aunty since my marriage to Paras, she was one of the very few people who made it all the way to Bangaldesh for our wedding. Paras always raves so much about her food. Paras spent a lot of his childhood at Mayuri Aunty's house so he knew very well the extent of her culinary skills.

   When my parents visited Kenya for the first time, Mayuri Aunty cooked up a lovely feast for us. I knew then that all f Paras' raving was well substantianted. It was a Friday lunchtime meal cooked in Mombasa's sweltering March heat. When we turned up at her apartment, the whole place had a lovely aroma of home cooked food. My parents thoroughly enjoyed their meal and continue to appreciate her kind gesture.
 
    P and I have recently returned from a fabulous trip to Jordan where we got to sample some splendid Levantine cuisine. One of the highlights of our trip was a visit to the ancient city of Petra, one of the new seven wonders of the world!

   On our first night in the rose-red city, we made our way to Petra Kitchen, a local initiative where we joined two other couples (Austrian and American) to cook and share a Jordanian feast under the guidance of Chef Tareq. We chopped, diced, and assembled a selection of hot and cold mezzes, salads, soup and a main course. We mopped up the meal with the most deliciously soft, warm bread.

   With our bellies full, we headed out to experience Petra by Night - a magical candle lit walk to the fabled Treasury (Al-Khazneh). The sight is as every bit awe-inspiring as you might expect! We sat under the stars on blankets spread on the ground, sipping hot cups of mint tea, and listening to a Bedouin's flute song. 



   Here's the baba ghanoush recipe we learnt at Petra Kitchen that I have since recreated in my kitchen in London. In Arabic, baba can mean father or daddy, and ghanoush can mean spoilt or pampered. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the dish was named “perhaps with reference to its supposed invention by a member of a royal harem.” The pampered daddy may have been a sultan.


BABA GANOUSH
2 lb aubergines
1 green pepper
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 Tbsp mint chopped
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1 large tomato
1 medium onion
Salt
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp pomegranate molasses

1. Score the aubergines with a knife in a few places and roast under a hot grill for an hour until the skin is charred.
2. Leave to cool slightly, then scoop out the pulp and drain in a colander.
3. Mash the pulp into chunky pieces. Add olive oil and lemon juice.
4. Chop the onion, tomato and pepper, and add them to the aubergine purée. Add in the crushed garlic, lemon juice, olive oil and the pomegranate molasses.
5. Mix well, adjust the seasoning (if needed), and sprinkle the chopped herbs over the top. 
Tips:

  • Use baba ganoush as a dip with cut vegetables, toasted pita wedges, chips or any thing you like.
  • Use it as a spread in sandwiches.
  • Use it over your salad or serve as a sauce with pasta or couscous. 
  • Eggplants can be roasted over a flame or on a your BBQ stove. The best ones are those roasted over charcoal fire.
You may want to check out what other guests had prepared:
Dried Grapes Achaar Pickle

Chinese Cauliflower Rice
Eggless Upside Down Pineapple Cake

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

634.Mini Panettone#BreadBakers

My favourite Country

  When Anshie, blogger at Spice Roots asked members of Bread Bakers  group to bake breads from Italy as the April theme, I was really excited. I love the country and Italian breads with all that olive oil, roasted tomatoes, cheese, bell peppers. I've been wanting to try out panettone for such a long time, so I got the opportunity to bake it for this theme. 
   
    Panettone bread is usually baked as a Christmas breakfast or dessert treat in Italy. Full of fruit and wonderful aroma of orange, its suppose to like a cake but with yeast. Panettone means pane de tono--- bread of luxury.Its believed that this rich Italian bread has originated from Milan. When yeast was considered a luxury item, this bread was baked only during important religious events.
    
    Original panettone making process is long where the dough is allowed to proof for several days which adds to the fluffy texture. Fruits added to the bread are not soaked as in other sweet breads from other parts of Europe. However, modern world means newer techniques. Fruits are soaked in rum or sweet wine and added to the dough. Nowadays the dough is not allowed to proof for days.
    
     I first tasted a panettone years back when I had gone to UK to visit my parents. I fell in love with the cake like delicious rich bread. Having it with some butter and a cup of coffee was the ultimate treat. I know Christmas is far away, but who can wait for Christmas to bake this fruity bread? I had to grab the opportunity now and bake it.
     
     Panettone is sometimes considered as a dessert and served with dessert wine, tea or coffee or even with some mascarpone cheese. Leftover panettone is used to prepare French Toast.









Juliet Balcony in Verona

Panzarotti - a typical Italian street food

 these small thick based pizzas sold as Street Food

MINI PANETTONE
Makes 12
Recipe adapted from: BBC Good Food

For the Starter:
¾ cup plain flour
a pinch of dry active instant yeast
⅓ cup cool water

For the bread dough:
All of the starter
2¼ cup plain flour
¼ cup warm water or milk
2 large eggs
½ cup soft butter, divided
½ tsp Fiori di Sicilia *
2¼ tsp dry active instant yeast
1 tsp salt
⅓ cup sugar
½ cup golden raisins
½ cup chopped dried apricot
½ cup dried cranberries
½ cup mixed candied peel
2 tbsp grated orange or lemon peel (zest)

Make the starter:
Mix flour, yeast and water in a medium bowl. Cover with a lid or cling film and let it ferment overnight or for 8-10 hours.

Preparation of the bread:

  1. Mix flour, salt, sugar, yeast and zest in a big bowl.
  2. Add ¼ cup butter and rub it into the flour.
  3. Add eggs, Fiori di Sicilia and milk to the starter and whisk till its all mixed.
  4. Add the starter mixture to the flour.
  5. Mix with a wooden spoon. The dough will be quite sticky at this stage.
  6. Cover and let the dough rise till its nearly double the size.This will take about 1½ hours in warm climate.
  7. Mix raisins, mixed candied peel and cranberries and keep on the side till required.
  8. Lightly flour the worktop and remove the dough from the bowl onto the work top.
  9. Adding the remaining butter and dried fruits to the dough. 
  10. Knead till the fruit is all mixed into the dough.
  11. Cover the dough and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.
  12. Deflate the dough and divide it into 12 parts.
  13. Grease a muffin tray or line it with cake cups. I chose to use cardboard cake cups that I had got so overly excited about!
  14. Roll each dough part into a round shape and drop it into the prepared muffin tray. 
  15. Cover the tray with cling film and let the dough rise till its above the rim. I had to let it rise for 50-60 minutes.
  16. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  17. Bake the mini panettone for 25-30 minutes until golden brown. If they brown too quickly then cover the top with an aluminium foil.
  18. Brush butter over the top as soon the panettone is ready.
  19. Let it cool.
  20. Serve as it is or sprinkle icing sugar and then serve.
Tips:
  • I didn't get mini panettone molds so I chose to use cardboard cake cups. You can use a normal muffin tray which can be lined with muffin cups or brown/parchment paper.
  • To make a big panettone you will need a panettone pan or a straight sided tall pan about 1½ - 2 quart pan.
  • Add dried fruits of your choice.
  • * Fiori de Sicilia is 'Flower of Sicily', is an extract that combines vanilla, citrus and flower essence.If you don't get fiori di Sicilia you can add 1tsp vanilla and ⅛ tsp of orange oil and rose water for the floral fragrance. I added  1 tsp vanilla essence and  1tbsp orange blossom water.
  • I made these mini panettone again without eggs but found they turned out too dense in spite of adding more milk and butter.
You may want to check out what members have baked for the "Breads from Italy" theme :


#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.

We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.
If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com
BreadBakers



Monday, 10 April 2017

633. Watermelon Coconut and Rose Popsicles

Summer time

  It was in year 1 that I learnt that there were different seasons. Growing up in Nairobi, for us it was always hot during the day, cold at night and the occasional showers in April and October. That was pretty much what the weather was back then. Words like Summer, Winter, Spring and Autumn were all new to me, seasons not experienced as yet. Postcards and pictures in books made them all seem like such refreshing and exotic seasons. When my aunt and cousins went off to UK in the 70s its then we would hear from them how windy the autumns were, umbrellas flying away and how their hands would get ice cold shovelling the snow. Mombasa's hot weather was the hottest we would ever experience when we went there for our holidays in December.

   My first experience of a really scorching hot Indian Summer was when I was 12. That too in the really hot city of Ahmedabad and in May! It was unbearably hot for a girl who comes from a cool climate of Nairobi. My skin would burn and I'd get headaches. Back then, there were no reminders on television, radio or newspapers to stay hydrated. After a week or so I went to Mt. Abu and realised that summer everywhere in India is not as hot as Ahmedabad.

   My first experience of Autumn in UK was nearly 10 years ago. Chilly cold, windy, rainy and yes umbrellas would fly away. Just a few minutes outdoor and my nose would be all cold. However, I enjoyed the cold as I had had enough of the hot weather in Mombasa. Autumn in Canada which we witnessed in 2013 was an amazing experience, full of sun shine, colours and a bit of rain.

   So while all my family and friends living abroad, praise summer and wait for summer eagerly, I cannot seem to understand why! Its only after having spent the chilly autumn in UK that I realised what people meant when they say 'our bones need the heat'. Literally one gets the feeling that bones get cold in autumn and winter.

   Summer in India or other parts of the world is synonymous with flipflops, summer hats, caps, bikinis, sundresses, shorts, T shirts, ice creams, golas, chatpatta snacks, open air markets, picnics, sand, beach, cocktails, fragrant flowers, longer days, lazing under the shade of trees, sleeping on the lazy chair, feeling lethargic, cricket, football, sandwiches, funfairs,walks in the park or beaches, late evening outings, coconut water and so much more.

   When my kids were young, I would make them simple popsicles..freezing fresh fruit juice, ribena or even rose milk during the really hot season. Nowadays, with kids having left the coop, it's hubby and me only. Popsicles are a healthier way of satiating my hubby's call for dessert ever single day. Sometimes, I just freeze fresh fruit juice or on some days when I feel a bit energetic, then I may add something exotic to the fruit juice.

   This week our #FoodieMonday#Bloghop group decided on #Frozencoolers as the 87th theme. Mangoes and pineapples have disappeared and the market is flooded with watermelons. A couple of days ago I went to Nakumatt and complained on my cousin whatsapp group that the veggies section only had watermelon, coconut and ginger all spread out on the shelves. My young cousin replied, "waiting to see what concoction you come up with using these ingredients". Well here is my concoction, watermelon coconut and rose popsicles with a hint of ginger.









WATERMELON COCONUT AND ROSE POPSICLES
Makes 8

2 cups fresh watermelon juice (about 2½ cups of watermelon cubes)
½ cup shredded fresh coconut
8-10 mint leaves
2 tbsp rose syrup
½ tsp minced fresh ginger


  1. Puree the watermelon without any water in a blender. Strain the juice to remove seeds.
  2. Put the juice back in the blender. Add shredded coconut, mint leaves, rose syrup and ginger.
  3. Process it for a few seconds.
  4. Pour the juice into popsicle molds.
  5. Freeze for 4-6 hours and serve.
Tips:
  • If you don't like the taste of rose syrup add honey, maple syrup or simple sugar syrup instead.
  • If you don't have popsicle molds, use ice cream or small plastic cups. Pour the juice in the cups. Cover with foil. Make a slit in the foil, insert the stick in through it gently.
  • Ginger helps to fight tiredness,  bad summer microbes, loss of appetite and feeling of heaviness.
  • I've made these popsicles adding desiccated coconut and they didn't turn out too exciting. The bite of fresh coconut is what makes these popsicles yummy.
  • Spike your popsicles with some vodka, gin, tequila, triple sec, champagne, gin for an adult version.
You may want to check out other frozen coolers:
pineapple paleta





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Thursday, 27 April 2017

638. Methi and Spinach Potato Curry (Fenugreek and Spinach Potato Curry)

Guest No.9

       My guest this week is my sister in law Arti. She is my hubby's sister and the youngest.Yes we have two Arti's in the family... my brother's wife and my hubby's sister. When I got married, Arti was very thin.I thought that if somebody huffed and puffed and blew her away, she would probably fly away.  Her friends became my friends as I didn't know anyone in Mombasa(except for my aunt's family). At social gatherings she would make sure that I was not left alone. We didn't spend that many years together as after my marriage she went off to UK to complete her beautician course. She came back and that's when her training in the kitchen began under my mother in law. At breakfast time Nunu would explain to her how the dish she was supposed to cook is prepared. I too would have my ears open. 
      
      When I had my twins, she was a great help to me. My daughter Nami would cry in the evenings and the only person who could keep her quiet and calm was Arti. She had to keep rocking Nami for over an hour! Arti has always has been helpful and caring towards my children. They love spending time with her. 

      I will never forget the short holiday we spent together when she visited Montreal. Its probably the most time I've spent with her after she emigrated to US. We had a wonderful time with her. 

       My other memorable time with her is when she gave birth to her son. She had come down to Mombasa for her delivery. As my kids and her daughter were pretty young, Nunu decided to look after the kids at home while I went with her to the hospital when her labour pains began. I don't think I was scared when I gave birth to my kids but was really scared when she got exhausted and was finding it difficult to deliver her son. For me that was a nerve wrecking experience but by God's grace, all was well in the end.

       I have so much respect for her as she is a caring, loving and hard working person. Arti is a good cook and we all love her peas kofta curry and her farsi puri.

Over to Arti:
     When my brother first my bhabhi, he was over the moon, talking about her beautiful long hair which she cut off before the twins were born. Bhabhi had culinary skills from the time my brother got married to her. She would always surprise me by baking beautiful cakes on my birthdays. My children Veer and Pooja would always love to spend their holidays at mama and mami's house. Bhabhi has been very supportive when I made the biggest decision n my life of moving to US from Kenya. She helped me to clear the house, packing our goods and cooking meals.



METHI AND SPINACH POTATO CURRY

4 potatoes, peeled and cut into cubes
1 cup chopped fresh fenugreek (methi)
1 cup chopped spinach (palak)
3 tomatoes, blend into a puree
1 onion, chopped finely
1 tsp ginger paste
1 tsp green chilli paste
1 tsp garlic paste
1 tsp mustard seeds (rai)
1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)
4-5 peppercorns
4-5 cloves
2 cinnamon sticks (about an inch long)
pinch of asafoetida (hing)
1 tsp cumin powder (jeera powder)
1 tsp coriander powder (dhania powder)
¼ tsp turmeric powder (haldi)
1 tsp red chilli powder
½ tsp sugar
1 tsp pav bhaji masala
½ - 1 cup fresh cream
2-3 tbsp oil
salt according to taste
fresh coriander for garnishing

  1. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat.
  2. Add mustard, cumin seeds, cloves, peppercorn, cinnamon.
  3. When the mustard seeds begin to crackle add a pinch of asafoetida.
  4. Add the chopped onions and garlic paste. Stir fry for a few minutes.
  5. Add methi, spinach and potatoes.
  6. Add salt, cumin, coriander, chilli and turmeric powders.
  7. Add ginger and green chilli paste. Mix well.
  8. Cover the pan and cook till the potatoes are done.
  9. Add tomato puree, sugar and pav bhaji masala.
  10. Let the tomato puree cook for 4-5 minutes.
  11. Add the fresh cream.You should get an orangish colour gravy.
  12. Garnish with fresh chopped coriander.Serve the curry with parathas or rice.
You may want to check out what the other guests had prepared:

Eggless Zucchini Bread Muffins
Baba Ganoush







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Monday, 24 April 2017

637. Baked Turmeric Tostones

A Healthy Snack

   Its Monday and that means the #FoodieMonday #Bloghop group will have a theme decided on last week and the recipes are live on Mondays. For our #89th theme,our group decided on #raw bananas which was suggested by Kriti, food blogger at Krispy Kadhai.

   I'm not new to raw bananas, plantains or matoke as its called in East Africa. Matoke is a part of the staple diet for many Ugandans. They add it to stew, mash it, fry it, grill it in charcoal fire or boil it. Lets not confuse the normal sweet banana with the raw banana or plantain. Plantain is the cousin of the sweet banana. It has many nutritional values just like the sweet banana. However, you cannot consume plantains in the raw form. Many diet plans replace plantains to make tortillas, cakes, cookies, mash, pizza base etc.The charming thing about plantains is that they are available throughout the year.The reason plantains is a part of the staple diet for many African countries is because its high in carbohydrates, therefore provides the much needed energy, keeps on fuller for longer periods of time. Plantains are rich in potassium and fiber,rich in Vitamin C. 
 There are 3 type of raw bananas, plantains or matoke. 

  • The pulp of the green ones is fairly hard and are starchy and not sweet. Usually one needs to peel them using a knife. The green ones are best for making  plantain chips.
  • The yellow plantains are slightly sweet and mature.These plantains are usually fried,boiled, grilled and used in stews or to prepare mash.
  • Black plantains in spite of the colour are still good to eat.At this stage they are the sweetest and softest.These are usually used for baking and desserts.
   I've grown up eating plantain chips or crisps as we call them in this part of the world. They are my favourite. So when I came across an unusual recipe (well, for me!) where the green plantain is baked but tastes similar to plantain chips, I decided to try out the recipe. 
   Tostones (pronounced as tos-toe-nays) are a popular snack dish in many Caribbean and Latin American parts of the world. The ones sold as street food are fried. Chunks of plantains are fried till just cooked. Then they are smashed and fried again. I was so tempted to fry them but then I remembered that this month I'm trying to keep away from fried goodies (difficult I must say!). So the hunt began for the baked ones. The baked ones tasted delicious but I would advise that have them as soon as they are ready. A few were left and they lost their crunchiness. I will try the fried ones at some point but till then the healthy version will have to do.
  
   Tostones are usually served with a garlic sauce called Mojo (pronounced as Mo-ho). I prepared the sauce but didn't like it. However, I will add the recipe for you to try. Next time my tostones will be served with mayonnaise sauce, chilli sauce,guacamole, salsa or the good old Indian green chutney :)








BAKED TOSTONES
Serves 4
Recipe source: Skinny Taste

3 green plantains
2 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp sea salt
¼ tsp turmeric powder (haldi)

For Mojo sauce:
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
½ tsp oregano (dried)
¼ cup orange juice
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp coarse pepper powder
¼ tsp salt

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Line a baking tray with parchment paper. If like me you've run out of parchment paper, then grease the tray lightly with oil.
  2. Mix 1 tbsp oil, salt and turmeric powder in a big bowl.
  3. First you need to peel the plantains. Cut a slit through the skin lengthwise. Using your fingers, peel away the skin.
  4. Cut the plantains into ½ " chunks and put it in the bowl with the oil mixture.
  5. Mix well till all the pieces are coated with oil.
  6. Arrange the plantain pieces in the tray with the cut side facing up.
  7. Bake for 10-15 minutes till they are slightly brown. Don't overcook them.
  8. Remove the tray from the oven.
  9. If you don't have a tostonera (a press) then you can use a glass or a small bowl.
  10. Press each piece down. I would recommend that you do that on a chopping board or a plate and not on the hot tray as the tostones may get stuck.
  11. Lightly oil the tray again.
  12. Arrange the smashed plantain pieces on the baking tray.
  13. Brush them lightly with olive oil.
  14. Bake again for 15 minutes till they are light golden brown. Make sure half way you flip the tostones.
  15. To prepare the mojo sauce, mix all the ingredients.
  16. Serve immediately.
Tips:
  • Can make this during the fasting or Ekadashi time, but don't serve it with the garlic sauce. A yogurt dip would go well with it.
  • If during fasting you don't use turmeric powder, then omit it.
  • To get a nice smashed piece make sure you don't slice the bananas too thin.
  • For  more crispy tostones bake further for 5 minutes.
You may want to check out other plantain recipes:

raw banana paneer pattis
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Tuesday, 18 April 2017

Salads 2

Healthy and filling Salads

Salads don't have to be boring. You can make a wholesome and filling meal by adding your choice of vegetables, fruits, nuts, rice, pasta, quinoa, bulgur wheat or whatever you like. The final combination should look colourful and appetizing. 

Here are a few salads you can make as a light meal for dinner or even as packed lunch. Just pack the dressing separately in a little jar or bottle.



Click on the salad names for the recipe

In order from top left to right :

Sweet Potato and Pasta Salad

Peanut and Fruit Salad

Rice Salad

Mango and Curried Chickpea Salad

In order from bottom left to right:

Moroccan Couscous Salad

Burrito Bowl Salad

Cucumber and Orange Salad

Mango Avocado Salad
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Monday, 17 April 2017

636. Watermelon Bruschetta

Antipasti

         Italian meals are usually served with a starter. Starters or antipasti (singular antipasto) usually consist of cured meat, pickled vegetables, mushrooms, cheeses, olives, peperocini, pickled meats etc. These are suppose to be colourful, attractive and usually should be able to change the mood of  people or gathering who will dine together. Anti means before and pastus means meal. Therefore its the starter or appetizer. Antipasti is usually served in individual plates or as bite size where diners pick it and enjoy it. It can be cold or warm or hot.
         
       There is much confusion between the crostini and the bruschetta. Crostini are usually made from small bread slices like an Italian baguette.The bread is toasted and the topping are more rich. 
       
       Bruschetta is usually served on more rustic Italian bread slices that are slightly bigger. The bread slices are usually roasted over coal. The word bruschetta comes from the Italian word bruscare...which means to roast over coal. The slices are usually rubbed with garlic and drizzled with olive oil. Originally it was served with olive oil drizzled on it. Nowadays a variety of topping are used to make bruschetta.
        
        Nowadays there's not much difference between the two especially when you're not able to roast a bread over coal. Bruschetta are prepared with whichever bread is available. I baked an Italian baguette at home a day before I wanted to make the crostini. After just 20 minutes of  second fermentation, the shaped bread looked a bit fatter and no way was I going to get nice dainty slices. 
        
       As the other ingredients were ready and wine already chilled, I decided to deviate from the norm and made Watermelon Bruschetta. #FoodieMonday #Bloghop group decided that  #watermelon will be our 88th theme. My contribution for this theme is the delicious and refreshing Watermelon Bruschetta.







WATERMELON BRUSCHETTA
Makes 8-10 pieces

8-10 slices of bread preferably a baguette or any other rustic bread
4-5 cloves of garlic
4-6 tbsp olive oil
1½ cups watermelon chopped into small cubes
1 cup crumbled feta cheese
½ cup thick plain yogurt
½ cup coarse pepper powder
8-10 black olives, sliced
2 tbsp balsamic syrup
2-3 tbsp chopped spring onion
10-12 mint leaves chopped


  1. Mix crumbled feta and yogurt together to get a smooth paste.Add pepper powder and mix well.
  2. Smear olive oil over the slices on both sides.
  3. Toast them lightly in a pan over medium heat.
  4. Rub garlic over the toasted slices.
  5. Spread some feta cheese mixture over the slices.
  6. Top the slices with watermelon, olives, spring onion and mint.
  7. Drizzle some balsamic syrup over the topping and serve.
Tips:
  • I did not add any salt as both the feta and bottled olives are salty.
  • You can toast the slices over a BBQ grill.
  • Use ricotta cheese instead of Feta if your prefer.
You may want to check out other starter recipes:
mashed avocado and tomato bruschetta


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Friday, 14 April 2017

635.Baba Ganoush

GUEST NO.8 ON THE BLOG

    My 8th Guest on the blog is Mehwaesh Islam. Now you may be wondering how did an Islam enter the Patel family. Let me clear up the air for you. Mehwaesh is originally from Bangladesh, married to my best friend Daxa's son. Daxa and family are more like family than friends to me.Paras, her son is like my son. So technically that makes Mehwaesh my daughter in law. I first met Mehwaesh during their wedding in Bangladesh. At first sight she appeared to me as a very sophisticated lady. On getting to know her, she is a very intelligent, caring, quiet and a friendly person. I had the opportunity to lunch with them at their quaint little home in London. From her little little kitchen she was able to put out quite a fare from chaat as a starter to egg biryani and sabji followed by dessert. What I loved about her cooking was that little Bangladeshi touch and flavour to most of her dishes. As I follow them on social media both husband and wife team practically every weekend introduce me to new cuisine, new street food, new open air markets and exciting places to visit. Both are foodies and I'm sure that when I next visit them, there will be new dishes for me to sample.

    Mehwaesh works in science policy. Give her a book and she's the happiest girl on earth. Her other hobbies are watching Turkish dramas, knitting, cooking and travelling. 

Over to Mehwaesh:
     Huge thanks to Mayuri Aunty for inviting me to post a recipe on her blog.I have know Mayuri Aunty since my marriage to Paras, she was one of the very few people who made it all the way to Bangaldesh for our wedding. Paras always raves so much about her food. Paras spent a lot of his childhood at Mayuri Aunty's house so he knew very well the extent of her culinary skills.

   When my parents visited Kenya for the first time, Mayuri Aunty cooked up a lovely feast for us. I knew then that all f Paras' raving was well substantianted. It was a Friday lunchtime meal cooked in Mombasa's sweltering March heat. When we turned up at her apartment, the whole place had a lovely aroma of home cooked food. My parents thoroughly enjoyed their meal and continue to appreciate her kind gesture.
 
    P and I have recently returned from a fabulous trip to Jordan where we got to sample some splendid Levantine cuisine. One of the highlights of our trip was a visit to the ancient city of Petra, one of the new seven wonders of the world!

   On our first night in the rose-red city, we made our way to Petra Kitchen, a local initiative where we joined two other couples (Austrian and American) to cook and share a Jordanian feast under the guidance of Chef Tareq. We chopped, diced, and assembled a selection of hot and cold mezzes, salads, soup and a main course. We mopped up the meal with the most deliciously soft, warm bread.

   With our bellies full, we headed out to experience Petra by Night - a magical candle lit walk to the fabled Treasury (Al-Khazneh). The sight is as every bit awe-inspiring as you might expect! We sat under the stars on blankets spread on the ground, sipping hot cups of mint tea, and listening to a Bedouin's flute song. 



   Here's the baba ghanoush recipe we learnt at Petra Kitchen that I have since recreated in my kitchen in London. In Arabic, baba can mean father or daddy, and ghanoush can mean spoilt or pampered. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the dish was named “perhaps with reference to its supposed invention by a member of a royal harem.” The pampered daddy may have been a sultan.


BABA GANOUSH
2 lb aubergines
1 green pepper
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 Tbsp mint chopped
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1 large tomato
1 medium onion
Salt
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp pomegranate molasses

1. Score the aubergines with a knife in a few places and roast under a hot grill for an hour until the skin is charred.
2. Leave to cool slightly, then scoop out the pulp and drain in a colander.
3. Mash the pulp into chunky pieces. Add olive oil and lemon juice.
4. Chop the onion, tomato and pepper, and add them to the aubergine purée. Add in the crushed garlic, lemon juice, olive oil and the pomegranate molasses.
5. Mix well, adjust the seasoning (if needed), and sprinkle the chopped herbs over the top. 
Tips:

  • Use baba ganoush as a dip with cut vegetables, toasted pita wedges, chips or any thing you like.
  • Use it as a spread in sandwiches.
  • Use it over your salad or serve as a sauce with pasta or couscous. 
  • Eggplants can be roasted over a flame or on a your BBQ stove. The best ones are those roasted over charcoal fire.
You may want to check out what other guests had prepared:
Dried Grapes Achaar Pickle

Chinese Cauliflower Rice
Eggless Upside Down Pineapple Cake

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Tuesday, 11 April 2017

634.Mini Panettone#BreadBakers

My favourite Country

  When Anshie, blogger at Spice Roots asked members of Bread Bakers  group to bake breads from Italy as the April theme, I was really excited. I love the country and Italian breads with all that olive oil, roasted tomatoes, cheese, bell peppers. I've been wanting to try out panettone for such a long time, so I got the opportunity to bake it for this theme. 
   
    Panettone bread is usually baked as a Christmas breakfast or dessert treat in Italy. Full of fruit and wonderful aroma of orange, its suppose to like a cake but with yeast. Panettone means pane de tono--- bread of luxury.Its believed that this rich Italian bread has originated from Milan. When yeast was considered a luxury item, this bread was baked only during important religious events.
    
    Original panettone making process is long where the dough is allowed to proof for several days which adds to the fluffy texture. Fruits added to the bread are not soaked as in other sweet breads from other parts of Europe. However, modern world means newer techniques. Fruits are soaked in rum or sweet wine and added to the dough. Nowadays the dough is not allowed to proof for days.
    
     I first tasted a panettone years back when I had gone to UK to visit my parents. I fell in love with the cake like delicious rich bread. Having it with some butter and a cup of coffee was the ultimate treat. I know Christmas is far away, but who can wait for Christmas to bake this fruity bread? I had to grab the opportunity now and bake it.
     
     Panettone is sometimes considered as a dessert and served with dessert wine, tea or coffee or even with some mascarpone cheese. Leftover panettone is used to prepare French Toast.









Juliet Balcony in Verona

Panzarotti - a typical Italian street food

 these small thick based pizzas sold as Street Food

MINI PANETTONE
Makes 12
Recipe adapted from: BBC Good Food

For the Starter:
¾ cup plain flour
a pinch of dry active instant yeast
⅓ cup cool water

For the bread dough:
All of the starter
2¼ cup plain flour
¼ cup warm water or milk
2 large eggs
½ cup soft butter, divided
½ tsp Fiori di Sicilia *
2¼ tsp dry active instant yeast
1 tsp salt
⅓ cup sugar
½ cup golden raisins
½ cup chopped dried apricot
½ cup dried cranberries
½ cup mixed candied peel
2 tbsp grated orange or lemon peel (zest)

Make the starter:
Mix flour, yeast and water in a medium bowl. Cover with a lid or cling film and let it ferment overnight or for 8-10 hours.

Preparation of the bread:

  1. Mix flour, salt, sugar, yeast and zest in a big bowl.
  2. Add ¼ cup butter and rub it into the flour.
  3. Add eggs, Fiori di Sicilia and milk to the starter and whisk till its all mixed.
  4. Add the starter mixture to the flour.
  5. Mix with a wooden spoon. The dough will be quite sticky at this stage.
  6. Cover and let the dough rise till its nearly double the size.This will take about 1½ hours in warm climate.
  7. Mix raisins, mixed candied peel and cranberries and keep on the side till required.
  8. Lightly flour the worktop and remove the dough from the bowl onto the work top.
  9. Adding the remaining butter and dried fruits to the dough. 
  10. Knead till the fruit is all mixed into the dough.
  11. Cover the dough and let it rest for 10-15 minutes.
  12. Deflate the dough and divide it into 12 parts.
  13. Grease a muffin tray or line it with cake cups. I chose to use cardboard cake cups that I had got so overly excited about!
  14. Roll each dough part into a round shape and drop it into the prepared muffin tray. 
  15. Cover the tray with cling film and let the dough rise till its above the rim. I had to let it rise for 50-60 minutes.
  16. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  17. Bake the mini panettone for 25-30 minutes until golden brown. If they brown too quickly then cover the top with an aluminium foil.
  18. Brush butter over the top as soon the panettone is ready.
  19. Let it cool.
  20. Serve as it is or sprinkle icing sugar and then serve.
Tips:
  • I didn't get mini panettone molds so I chose to use cardboard cake cups. You can use a normal muffin tray which can be lined with muffin cups or brown/parchment paper.
  • To make a big panettone you will need a panettone pan or a straight sided tall pan about 1½ - 2 quart pan.
  • Add dried fruits of your choice.
  • * Fiori de Sicilia is 'Flower of Sicily', is an extract that combines vanilla, citrus and flower essence.If you don't get fiori di Sicilia you can add 1tsp vanilla and ⅛ tsp of orange oil and rose water for the floral fragrance. I added  1 tsp vanilla essence and  1tbsp orange blossom water.
  • I made these mini panettone again without eggs but found they turned out too dense in spite of adding more milk and butter.
You may want to check out what members have baked for the "Breads from Italy" theme :


#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.

We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.
If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com
BreadBakers



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Monday, 10 April 2017

633. Watermelon Coconut and Rose Popsicles

Summer time

  It was in year 1 that I learnt that there were different seasons. Growing up in Nairobi, for us it was always hot during the day, cold at night and the occasional showers in April and October. That was pretty much what the weather was back then. Words like Summer, Winter, Spring and Autumn were all new to me, seasons not experienced as yet. Postcards and pictures in books made them all seem like such refreshing and exotic seasons. When my aunt and cousins went off to UK in the 70s its then we would hear from them how windy the autumns were, umbrellas flying away and how their hands would get ice cold shovelling the snow. Mombasa's hot weather was the hottest we would ever experience when we went there for our holidays in December.

   My first experience of a really scorching hot Indian Summer was when I was 12. That too in the really hot city of Ahmedabad and in May! It was unbearably hot for a girl who comes from a cool climate of Nairobi. My skin would burn and I'd get headaches. Back then, there were no reminders on television, radio or newspapers to stay hydrated. After a week or so I went to Mt. Abu and realised that summer everywhere in India is not as hot as Ahmedabad.

   My first experience of Autumn in UK was nearly 10 years ago. Chilly cold, windy, rainy and yes umbrellas would fly away. Just a few minutes outdoor and my nose would be all cold. However, I enjoyed the cold as I had had enough of the hot weather in Mombasa. Autumn in Canada which we witnessed in 2013 was an amazing experience, full of sun shine, colours and a bit of rain.

   So while all my family and friends living abroad, praise summer and wait for summer eagerly, I cannot seem to understand why! Its only after having spent the chilly autumn in UK that I realised what people meant when they say 'our bones need the heat'. Literally one gets the feeling that bones get cold in autumn and winter.

   Summer in India or other parts of the world is synonymous with flipflops, summer hats, caps, bikinis, sundresses, shorts, T shirts, ice creams, golas, chatpatta snacks, open air markets, picnics, sand, beach, cocktails, fragrant flowers, longer days, lazing under the shade of trees, sleeping on the lazy chair, feeling lethargic, cricket, football, sandwiches, funfairs,walks in the park or beaches, late evening outings, coconut water and so much more.

   When my kids were young, I would make them simple popsicles..freezing fresh fruit juice, ribena or even rose milk during the really hot season. Nowadays, with kids having left the coop, it's hubby and me only. Popsicles are a healthier way of satiating my hubby's call for dessert ever single day. Sometimes, I just freeze fresh fruit juice or on some days when I feel a bit energetic, then I may add something exotic to the fruit juice.

   This week our #FoodieMonday#Bloghop group decided on #Frozencoolers as the 87th theme. Mangoes and pineapples have disappeared and the market is flooded with watermelons. A couple of days ago I went to Nakumatt and complained on my cousin whatsapp group that the veggies section only had watermelon, coconut and ginger all spread out on the shelves. My young cousin replied, "waiting to see what concoction you come up with using these ingredients". Well here is my concoction, watermelon coconut and rose popsicles with a hint of ginger.









WATERMELON COCONUT AND ROSE POPSICLES
Makes 8

2 cups fresh watermelon juice (about 2½ cups of watermelon cubes)
½ cup shredded fresh coconut
8-10 mint leaves
2 tbsp rose syrup
½ tsp minced fresh ginger


  1. Puree the watermelon without any water in a blender. Strain the juice to remove seeds.
  2. Put the juice back in the blender. Add shredded coconut, mint leaves, rose syrup and ginger.
  3. Process it for a few seconds.
  4. Pour the juice into popsicle molds.
  5. Freeze for 4-6 hours and serve.
Tips:
  • If you don't like the taste of rose syrup add honey, maple syrup or simple sugar syrup instead.
  • If you don't have popsicle molds, use ice cream or small plastic cups. Pour the juice in the cups. Cover with foil. Make a slit in the foil, insert the stick in through it gently.
  • Ginger helps to fight tiredness,  bad summer microbes, loss of appetite and feeling of heaviness.
  • I've made these popsicles adding desiccated coconut and they didn't turn out too exciting. The bite of fresh coconut is what makes these popsicles yummy.
  • Spike your popsicles with some vodka, gin, tequila, triple sec, champagne, gin for an adult version.
You may want to check out other frozen coolers:
pineapple paleta





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